Posidonius Area

Posidonius Crater
Posidonius Crater

Hi all,

Friday evening just before the altocumulus clouds of the approaching depression covered the sky, I could do another sketch of the moon: This time it was crater Posidonius and its surroundings.

Ah, by the way, this time I tried a new pen: For the bright areas (e. g. the western rims of Posidonius A and J), I took a whitecoal pen instead of chalk pen. That provided much brighter contrast.

Another novelty for me: I didn’t use a diagonal but an Amici prism, so that the view in the eyepiece wasn’t mirrored at all. The view was a bit less bright, but for the moon it’s still bright enough.

Object Name: Posidonius
Object Type: Lunar Crater
Location: Germany, Dusseldorf area
Date: 2015-04-24, 2130-2205 CEST
Media: chalk pastel pencil, whitecoal pencil and charcoal pencil on black sketching cardbox
Telescope: Celestron Nexstar 127 SLT
Eyepiece: TS HR Planetary 7mm

Clear skies

Achim


Posidonius Crater

Posidonius Crater
Posidonius Crater

Hi all,

yesterday evening just before the altocumulus clouds of the approaching depression covered the sky, I could do another sketch of the moon: This time it was crater Posidonius and its surroundings.

Ah, by the way, this time I tried a new pen: For the bright areas (e. g. the western rims of Posidonius A and J), I took a whitecoal pen instead of chalk pen. That provided much brighter contrast.

Another novelty for me: I didn’t use a diagonal but an Amici prism, so that the view in the eyepiece wasn’t mirrored at all. The view was a bit less bright, but for the moon it’s still bright enough.

Object Name: Posidonius
Object Type: Lunar Crater
Location: Germany, Dusseldorf area
Date: 2015-04-24, 2130-2205 CEST
Media: chalk pastel pencil, whitecoal pencil and charcoal pencil on black sketching cardbox
Telescope: Celestron Nexstar 127 SLT
Eyepiece: TS HR Planetary 7mm

Clear skies

Achim


Crinkled Solar Surface – 21 March 2015

H-Alpha Solar - 21 March2015
H-Alpha Solar – 21 March2015

Aloha,

Todays solar surface showed some interesting features that I tried to capture. There were a lot of long detailed filaments as well as a region to the east that looked like a piece of silk that had been crinkled and then flattened. To the west of this area was a brightening plage, at the moment the brightest region in the observation besides a bright spike on the limb. The prominences to the north were more subtle and dim.

White sketch paper
Grey charcoal, Tombow pencils 2H, 6B
White acrylic paint (plage)
Blending pencil
Photoscape to adjust contrast

60mm Lunt h-alpha 36x
3/21/2015 2010-2035 UT
Seeing Wilson 4/5 Transparency 2/4
Cindy (Thia) L. Krach
Maui, Hawaii


Sunrise at Mare Crisium

Mare Crisium
Mare Crisium

Hi,

find attached a charcoal and pastel sketch of the sunrise at Mare Crisium. I hope you like it.

Object Name: Mare Crisium, eastern part
Object Type: Lunar Maria
Location: Germany, Dusseldorf area
Date: 2015-03-22, 2020-2100 CET
Media: chalk pastel pencil and charcoal pencil on black sketching cardbox
Telescope: Celestron Nexstar 127 SLT
Eyepiece: TS HR Planetary 7mm

Clear skies

Achim


Young Winter December Moon

"The Young Winter December Moon" - December 23, 2014
“The Young Winter December Moon” – December 23, 2014

Young Winter December Moon

During the early part of the current lunation I was observing and sketching in Mesa, Arizona and caught the thin crescent Moon in the southwestern sky just after sunset. Venus was also visible much closer to the horizon but not close enough to the Moon to be included. Earthshine improved and brightened as the hour passed.

Sketching:
For this sketch I used dark blue sketching paper (8.5” x 11”), white, yellow and brown pastel pencils, blending stumps, white Pearl eraser.

Telescope 6”f/7.2 Dobsonian telescope, 28mm eyepiece 39x
Date and Time: 12-23-2014; 18:15 – 19:10 local time
Seeing: Antoniadi III
Transparency: clear 4/5
Temperature: 18 °C (65°F)
Colongitude: 295.3°
Lunation: 1.74 days
Illumination: 4.1%

Frank McCabe


Vallis Schröteri

Vallis Schröteri, a huge lava vent and rille system on the Aristarchus Plateau - January 2, 2015
Vallis Schröteri, a huge lava vent and rille system on the Aristarchus Plateau – January 2, 2015

Hi,

find attached a charcoal and pastel sketch of Aristarchus, Herodotus and the famous Vallis Schröteri. I hope you like it.

Object Name: Vallis Schröteri, Aristarchus, Herodotus
Object Type: Lunar Valley and Crater
Location: Germany, Dusseldorf area
Date: 2015-01-02, 1800-1845 CET
Media: chalk pastel pencil and charcoal pencil on black sketching cardbox
Telescope: Martini 10” f/5 Dobsonian
Eyepiece: Skywatcher HR Planetary 5mm
Clear skies!

Achim


Big Bowl of Pythagoras

Lunar crater Pythagoras - January 3, 2015
Lunar crater Pythagoras – January 3, 2015

Object Name – Pythagoras
Object Type – Lunar impact crater
Location – Deventer, The Netherands
Date – Januari 3, 2015
Media – White pastel pencil on black paper

So far this winter is terrible for astronomy. Nothing but clouds and rain in the Netherlands… But yesterday evening the skies finally cleared and my 3″ Polarex Unitron was quickly set up in the backyard. Crater Pythagoras on the northeastern limb of the Moon looked particularly nice – like a deep rocky bowl in the lunar surface. Seeing conditions were fair, so I pumped up the magnifcation to a crazy (for a 3″) 200x. It still gave a pleasant and sharp view and sketching was quite comfortable with the crater looking big in the eyepiece.

Pythagoras is a 130km wide impact crater with staggering 5km high terraced walls. The central peaks (I could see two of them) are also pretty huge: 3,5km high! Imagine the panoramic view from the top op one of those mountains….

Sketch made with a pastel pencil on black paper, through a 3″ Polarex Unitron at 200x (Baader 6mm BGO). The image is mirror reversed.

Clear Skies,
Roel Weijenberg
www.roelblog.nl


Surprise Libration

The lunar crater Gauss and environs seen in different librations on January 16, 2014 and December 8, 2014
The lunar crater Gauss and environs seen in different librations on January 16, 2014 and December 8, 2014

Last night I made a sketch of Lunar crater Gauss and its surroundings. While archiving the sketch this morning I realised I already sketched this part of the Moon almost a year ago, so I got the idea of a side by side comparison to show the effect of lunation. To my surprise I found out these sketches were made at the exact same lunation: 15.5 days. The difference in lighting therefore had to be caused mainly by the Moon’s libration; the slow wobbling of the Moon in its orbit. A pleasant suprise to find out I sketched this phenomenon totally unintentionally!

Both sketches were made using a 3″ Polarex Unitron refractor at 171x, with a white pastel pencil on black paper. Orientation and size were matched using Photoshop.

Object Name: Gauss
Object Type: Lunar crater, libration
Location: Deventer, The Netherlands
Date: December 8, 2014
Media: white pastel pencil, black paper

Clear skies!
Roel Weijenberg
www.roelblog.nl


Rabbit on the Moon

The Rabbit on the Moon, a naked eye sketch showing a commonly recognized pattern - November 5, 2014
The Rabbit on the Moon, a naked eye sketch showing a commonly recognized pattern – November 5, 2014

Rabbit On The Moon
Lunar Observing Pattern
Pilanesberg Game Reserve South Africa
5th November
Jet Black Canford Paper with White Pastel Pencil. Used a smartphone to take a picture and crop.
Sketched on holiday in South Africa – The ‘Rabbit on the Moon’ pattern really jumps out at you from Southern Skies and creates a whole new observing experience if you are used to the Northern hemisphere.


Biggest sunspot group in 20 years

Active Region 2192, an unusually large sunspot group - October 27, 2014
Active Region 2192, an unusually large sunspot group – October 27, 2014

Clouds made it not easy to observe the enormous sunspot group AR 2192 in the Low Countries. I had only one good day to observe and sketch this marvel at ease. Thanks to good seeing conditions I could see – despite my small telescope – an impressive amount of detail. I hope the group will survive his voyage on the far side of the sun and give us another beautiful display.

Clear skies
Jef De Wit

Object: Sun
Location: Biggekerke, Netherlands (51°29’ N 3°31’ E)
Date and time: 27 October 2014, around 9.30 UT
Equipment: 8 cm refractor, Baader Herschel wedge, Solar Continuum filter
Eyepiece: 13mm Nagler T6 (79x)
Medium: white, gray and black pastel pencils, a Pierre Noire pencil and a light gray soft pastel on white printing paper, scanned, mirror reversed, contrast adjustments with Paint Shop Pro


Two Big Prominences on the Edge

Two large solar prominences on the limb - October 4, 2014
Two large solar prominences on the limb – October 4, 2014

Object Name: Sun
Object Type: Solar prominence
Location: Deventer, The Netherlands
Date: October 4, 2014
Media: pastel pencils on black paper

As the days shorten rapidly and the sun gets more south every day, the warm afternoons are coming to an end in the Netherlands. On what could be the last sunny and warm day of the year, the active Sun was the obvious target for an astronomical sketch. I set up my modded 60mm Unitron/Polarex refractor and sketched two large prominences on the western edge of the solar disk. The prominences were of the “stable” and relatively long lasting type, but still a lot of internal swirling and changes in brightness could be seen in both at high magnifications. Due to seeing conditions magnifications were limited to about 80x-100x. I made two separate sketches, but got the idea of combining them in a composition when photographing them afterwards.

Kind regards,
Roel Weijenberg


Crater Gassendi and the northern part of Mare Humorum

Lunar crater Gassendi and the the northern part of Mare Humorum - September 5, 2014
Lunar crater Gassendi and the the northern part of Mare Humorum – September 5, 2014

Here is a sketch of the Moon on the 5th of September from my backyard
in Adelaide, South Australia.

The moons phase was waxing at 83%, with only the very western edge
still in shadow. I observed with a C11 SCT. Seeing was quite
reasonable, so I took a 15mm eyepiece + 2x Barlow for a close look.

The shallow illumination on Mare Humorum made the creases on the mare
floor stand out. Crater Gassendi, toward the bottom, showed stark
shadows. Rimae Hippalus was visible, passing through the partially
submerged crater Hippalus at the top right. Because I used a diagonal
prism, the sketch is mirror imaged.

I used pastel chalks and black and white pastel pencils on black
paper.

-Ivan


NGC 6520 and Barnard 86

NGC 6520 and Barnard 86
NGC 6520 and Barnard 86

Object Name: NGC 6520 and Barnard 86.
RA: 18h 03m 25.1s; Dec: -27° 53′ 28″
Magnitude: 7.6
NGC 6520 size: 6′
Distance: 6,000 light-years approx.
Constellation: Sagittarius.
Type: Open Cluster and Dark Nebula.
Description NGC 6520: Cl, pS, Ri, lV, st 9 … 13
Location: Bonilla. Cuenca. SPAIN
Date: July 24, 2014.
Time: 00:10 UT.
Material used: pastel pencils and white ink on black paper. Inverted image with Photoshop.
Celestron Telescope S/C 8″ Mount Cgt-5
Eyepiece: LV-M 22mm; Magnification: 92x.
Condition: 21.39 SQM. Temperature: 16º. Humidity 29%. Calm wind.


Spring’s Trio

Spring's Trio, "The Leo Triplet", galaxies M65, M66 and NGC 3628
Spring’s Trio, “The Leo Triplet”, galaxies M65, M66 and NGC 3628

It is spring’s trio.

The dark lane in the 3628 is really fantastic!

Before this sketch, I always confused M65 and M66.
But now I can classify 65 & 66.
Sketch is magical tool in the visual astronomy. 🙂

Object Name : Leo triple
Object Type : Galaxies
Location : S. Korea
Date : Nov. 11, 2013
Equipment : Discovery 15″ Dob
Media : Black paper, Jelly pen, Pastel pencil


The Challenge of Finding the Owl’s Eyes

Messier 97 - The Owl Nebula, a planetary nebula
Messier 97 – The Owl Nebula, a planetary nebula

The observing of the owl’s eye is very difficult for me.

I just have a glimsed by sketch…

Object Name : M97 (Owl Nebula)
Object Type : Planetary Nebula
Location : S. Korea
Date : Mar. 30, 2013
Equipment : Discovery 15″ Dob
Media : Black paper, Jelly pen, Pastel pencil


The Pipe Nebula

The Pipe Nebula
The Pipe Nebula

Hi,

For the first time I send you one of my sketches. I sketched the Pipe Nebula a month ago at Hakos Guestfarm / Namibia. It’s the first finished of about 20 sketches I did during 6 nights.

Data:
Object Name: Pipe Nebula (made of lots of Barnard Dark Nebulae)
Object type: Dark Nebula
Location: Hakos Guestfarm, Namib Naukluft, Namibia
Date: June 2nd and 3rd, 2014 (two nights, about 4 hours total of sketching while nebula passed zenith)
Media: Pastel and graphite pencils
Optics: Fujinon 25×150 Binoculars

Additional aspects:
Field is about 7 degrees wide.To concentrate on object (and not on dimensions) I used a pattern of stars printed from Guide 9. Sketch is processed with Photshop to change appearance from Grey/White to Black/Grey. Pinpoint stars and Globular Clusters added by Photoshop (to replace printed and sketched stars)

More sketches:
http://www.astrozeichnen.de/

Clear Skies!

Rainer


The Biggest Face in the Universe!

Messier 84/86 Group of Galaxies
Messier 84/86 Group of Galaxies

Seeing many objects in an eyepiece view is my favorite things!

So, I love galaxy groups.

M84/86 group like face shape.

He has two eyes, one little nose, smiling mouth, only one eyebrow, and ear…

It is biggest face in the universe!

Object Name : M84/86 group
Object Type : Galaxies
Location : S. Korea
Date : May. 30, 2014
Equipment : Discovery 15″ Dob
Media : Black paper, Jelly pen, Pastel pencil

Nightwid 無雲


Twilight Globular

Messier 5 Globular Cluster
Messier 5 Globular Cluster

Object Name: Messier 5
Object Type: Globular cluster
Location: Deventer, The Netherlands
Date: June 2, 2014
Media: White pastel and white gel pen on black paper

This time of year the sun never drops low enough under the horizon for
true astronomical darkness. Only after midnight we get a few hours of
relatively dark skies, but a faint blue glow always remains visible
above the northern horizon. However, bright objects can still be very
impressive in the eyepiece. Messier 5 is a fine example: a very bright
ball of stars, loosely scattered amidst a few dozen foreground stars.
When I made this sketch, the sun was only 12 degrees below the horizon.
What is very striking visually is the off-center core of M5. The
brightest part seems to be slightly to the west of the cluster.

I made the sketch using a white gel pen for the stars and a white soft
pastel pencil for the glow of unresolved stars. It was the first time I
made a positive deepsky sketch, normally I use graphite on white paper.
The image is the original field sketch.

Clear skies!

Roel Weijenberg
www.roelblog.nl


M78, A profile of tropical fish

Messier 78, Reflection nebula
Messier 78, Reflection nebula

Hi everyone!

I observed M78 &34 in Nov. midnight with my 15″ Dob.

While I drew M78, I reminded of tropical fish, it’s side face 🙂

The nebulousity of NGC 2071 is shine dimly.

Where does this tropical fish came from?

Deep cosmos? Deep see? or My eyes? 🙂

Object Name : M78
Object Type : Reflection Nebula
Location : S. Korea
Date : Nov. 11, 2013
Media : Black paper, Jelly pen, Pastel pencel


M53 Globular Cluster

Messier 53 Globular Cluster
Messier 53 Globular Cluster

Object Name: M 53 (NGC 5024)
Location: RA: 13h 12m 55.2s; Dec: +18° 10′ 08″
Magnitude: 7.7
Dimensions: 13′
Constellation: Coma Berenice
Type: Globular Cluster
Description: GC, B, vC, iR, vvmbM, star 12.
Location: Viso del Marqués. Ciudad Real. SPAIN
Date: May 3, 2014.
Time: 00:15 UT.
Material used: pastel pencils on black paper.
Celestron Telescope S / C 8 “Mount Cgt-5
Eyepiece: ES 14mm 100º;
Magnification: 145x.
Condition: NEML: 5’6 (Zone 11 Bootes).

More information: http://astrodibujo.blogspot.com.es/


Lunar Terminator Near to the Western Limb

LunarTerminator West Limb-February 25, 2013
LunarTerminator West Limb-February 25, 2013
LunarTerminator West Limb-February 25, 2013
LunarTerminator West Limb-February 25, 2013

Lunar Terminator Near to the Western Limb

On Sunday evening I was getting a wonderful view of the lunar terminator near the western limb just a half day before full Moon. The favorable longitudinal libration of -04° 40’ was creating an opportunity to see craters along the terminator that are often poorly placed for viewing.
With storms on the way from the southwest this was a good evening to attempt a sketch. The calm before the arrival of storms often leaves the seeing fair to good as was the case on this night. Craters such as Vasco da Gama (99 km.), Bohr (73 km.), Dalton (63 km.), Balboa (71 km.) and part of Einstein (175 km.) were all seen. Craters Cardanus (51 km.) and Krafft (53 km.) and the crater chain (catena) between them were in bright sunlight. The views all along the terminator were magnificent.
Sketching:

For this sketch I used: black Strathmore 400 Artagain paper (9” x 12”), white and black Conte’
pastel pencils. In addition a small artist’s brush and powdered Conte’ white crayon was used for blending. Contrast was slightly increased (+2) using a scanner to better match the original.
Telescope: 13.1 inch f/ 5.9 Dobsonian and 6 mm eyepiece 327 X
Date: 02-25-2013, 04:00-06:30 UT
Temperature: 0.0° C (32° F)
Partly cloudy, calm
Seeing: Antoniadi III
Colongitude 86.9 °
Lunation 14.87 days
Illumination 99.5 %

Frank McCabe


Three days in the life of crater Philolaus

Philolaus Crater
Philolaus Crater

Three nights in a row clear sky, it doesn’t happen a lot in cloudy Belgium. I guess I was just lucky. Nice to see the changing shadows and libration. I hope you like it too.

Clear skies
Jef De Wit

Object: Philolaus (+ Anaximenes, Anaxagoras, Mouchez and Poncelet)
Object type: lunar crater
Location: Hove, Belgium (51°09’ N 4°28’ E)
Date and time: 11-13 January 2014
Equipment: 8 cm refractor (WO Zenithstar 80 FD)
Eyepiece: 3,5 mm Nagler T6 (158x)
Medium: white, gray and black pastel pencils on black paper, scanned, contrast
adjustments with Paint Shop Pro, compilation and text with Paint


Geminid’s Rain

Geminid Meteor Shower - December 14, 2013
Geminid Meteor Shower – December 14, 2013

Object Name (Geminids)
Object Type (Meteor shower )
Location (Provence France)
Date (14 dec 2013)
Media (graphite pencil, watercolor, white paper, digital inversion )

From 4UT just after the moonset, I was observing one hour looking around the Leo area.
I begin to sketch the sky region where I was looking, +/- 45° from the radiant. We can see the Leo and the red Mars underneath.
Each time a meteor was burning out I put the trace on my white paper link with the estimated magnitude. Let says one minute after, because already years ago, I realized that sometime a meteor is following shortly by another one, just on the same track, like a double meteor. This morning I saw 42 Geminids and 2 sporadic’s, I don’t sketch the sporadic meteor here. The speed was quite low and the magnitudes quite brilliant.
The small village where I’m don’t care about light pollution, ok then, I use this to sketch the Christmas street decoration like it is.
Here follows my result of the watch,
December 14, 2013 (Val d’Issole, France)
Longitude 006 degrees 05′ 25″ East,
Latitude 43 degrees 18′ 15″ North.
UT Period Field Teff LM GEM SPO
4:00-5:05 60SSE 1.00 5.20 42 2

Total Meteors: 44
Magnitude Distributions:
Shower  -5  -4  -3  -2  -1   0   1   2   3   4   5

GEM      0   0   2   4   5   5   6  10   8   2   0
SPO      0   0   0   1   0   1   0   0   0   0   0

Based on this, my ZHR observation reaches 250!

It was a nice watch, a wonderful spectacle indeed.

Clear sky to you all

Michel Deconinck
http://astro.aquarellia.com/


The Art of Line

Messier 34
Messier 34

Hi everyone!

I observed M34 in Nov. midnight with my 15″ Dob.

The center of M34 has big & bright ‘Y’ shape, and many lines follow the ‘Y’!

It is very impressive and huge.

I drew all of the stars in my eyepiece through two nights.

But I couldn’t express M34 perpectly..

Who makes this fantastic star chains?

God? or My eyes? 🙂

Object Name : M34
Object Type : Open Cluster
Location : S. Korea
Date : Nov. 11, 2013
Media : Black paper, Jelly pen, Pastel pencil


Jupiter from November 4, 2011

Jupiter - November 4, 2011
Jupiter – November 4, 2011

Dear Asod,

I send you here attached my sketch of Jupiter made on 5th November 2011. Although the seeing was not so good I was able to see fine details I have not seen before, so that was a lucky day. I have even seen the colour so I decided to make my sketch with colour pastel pencil.

Equipment used: 130/650 SW, 130x
Date: 4th November 2011
Location: Budapest, Hungary
Media: brown shades of pastel pencils used on white paper.

dr. Hannák Judit


Saturn and Enceladus

Saturn and Enceladus- June 20, 2013
Saturn and Enceladus – June 20, 2013

I have not sketched Saturn this go around until now because of extremely poor weather so far this year. On Wednesday evening the atmosphere cooperated and I had a scope outside cooling down. I did not have access to any Saturn templates because of a computer crash. So I took out my old mechanical drawing equipment and made an ellipse of the approximate eccentricity of Saturn’s rings and sketched from there. It’s a bit crude but reasonably close to the view. Seeing was good and the atmosphere was transparent. I was able to see Mimas but it was just beyond the way I framed the sketch for posting. Enceladus was about 12th magnitude.

Sketching:
Date: 06/20/2013, 01:45 – 02:45 UT
Sky Conditions: Partly cloudy
Transparency: 3/5
Seeing: Pickering 7/10
For sketching I used 10” x 12” Canson black paper, white, gray, charcoal and black pastel pencils, powdered Conte’ crayons, white Pearl eraser, blending stumps.
Equipment: 18” f/4.95 Dobsonian with a 9mm ortho eyepiece for 250 x.
Neodymium filter and single polarizing filter
Frank McCabe


Grimaldi, Hevelius, Cavalerius

Grimaldi, Hevelius and Cavalerius
Grimaldi, Hevelius and Cavalerius

Object Name: Grimaldi, Hevelius, Cavalerius
Object Type: Lunar craters
Location: Twello, The Netherlands
Date: April 23, 2013
Media: White pastel pencil on black paper

It has been more than a year(!) since my last lunar sketch, but on the evening of April 23th I dragged my 3″ f/16 Polarex refractor outside for some good old sketching.
The most prominent feature on the lunar surface was a line of large craters formed by Grimaldi , Hevelius and Cavalerius. Although the Moon didn’t climb higher than 30 degrees above the Southern horizon, magnifications up to 200x could easily be used. High cirrus clouds made the image a bit hazy (and I had to stop sketching after an hour because of thickening clouds) but the seeing was quite good. The sketch was made through an old 7mm Orthoscopic eyepiece (171x). The image is mirror reversed (north=up, west=left).

Clear skies!
Roel Weijenberg
www.roelblog.nl


Gassendi Crater

Gassendi Crater
Gassendi Crater
Move cursor over image to view labels.

2012 06 01, 0238 UT – 0446 UT Gassendi
PCW Memorial Observatory, Texas, Erika Rix
www.pcwobservatory.com

Celestron Omni XLT 102mm, 24-8mm Baader Planetarium Mark III Hyperion, 2x Barlow, 250x
Temp 71° F, 60% humidity, S: Antoniadi II, T: 5/6
Eyepiece sketch black Strathmore Artagain paper, Conte crayon and pastel pencil, charcoal pencil
Phase: 45.8 deg, Lunation: 11.21 d, Illumination: 84.8%
Lib. Lat: +05:08, Lib. Long: -04:13
Az: +209:11, Alt: 41:03

Located on the northern border of Mare Humorum, crater Gassendi is an impact crater formed during the Nectarian period (-3.92 to 3.85 billion years ago) that later was modified after volcanic activity, becoming a fractured-floor crater. Gassendi is believed to have been filled with lava from the inside, raising its floor, creating stress fractures in the process. This would explain it being considered a walled plain with a shallow depth of 2.8 km. The central peaks (~1200 m high) remain and several rilles (called Rimae Gassendi) were formed on the lava-filled floor during the Imbrian geological period -3.85 to –3.2 billion years ago.

Crater Gassendi A was formed during the Copernician period (–1.1 billion years ago to the present day) and overlaps Gassendi’s northern rim. The pairing of Gassendi and Gassendi A resembles a diamond ring and makes a very striking feature to observe 3 days after first quarter or two days after last quarter of lunation. My observation was nearly three days after first quarter.

Gassendi’s southern rim was swallowed by the lava of Mare Humorum leaving only a thin crest line to support its circular shape. Dorsa ran from the southern rim to Gassendi O (11 km wide). The sharp ridge that defines the border of Mare Humorum to the SW of Gassendi adds to the crater’s unmistakable identification.

At the beginning of my session, Spica and Saturn lined up to align with the Moon. Spica was 2.08 degrees north of the Moon and Saturn was 6.9 degrees north of the Moon. Extending further north, Arcturus was nearly in line as well at 31.8 degrees north of the Moon


Craters Mercator, Campanus and Ramsden at Sunrise

Craters Mercator, Campanus and Ramsden
Craters Mercator, Campanus and Ramsden
Move cursor over image to view labels.

After another canceled public telescope viewing Friday evening due to thick clouds and light snow, I was pleased to see a nice Saturday filled with sunshine followed by a clear night.

With no particular sketching targets in mind, I scanned the terminator for interesting sketching targets and stopped when I could see sunrise at Ramsden (26 km.) along with all those crisscrossing rimae (rilles).

Northeastward away from Ramsden and across Palus Epidemiarum, I also added two additional ancient craters Mercator (49 km.) and Campanus (49 km.).

This break in our poor Chicagoland spring weather was long overdue.

Sketching:

For this sketch I used: 400 series black Strathmore Artagain paper 9″x 9″, white and black Conte’

pastel pencils , and Conte’crayons, a blending stump, plastic eraser.

Telescope: 10 inch f/5.7 Dobsonian with 6mm (241x)

Date: 4-21-2013 01:00 – 02:45 UT

Temperature: 7.2°C (45°F)

Weather: clear, calm

Seeing: good Antoniadi II-III

Co longitude: 35.4°

Lunation: 10.6 days

Illumination: 74.1%

Frank McCabe


Full Disc H-Alpha – April 22, 2013

H-Alpha Sun - April 22, 2013
H-Alpha Sun – April 22, 2013

Object Name: Sun
Object Type: Star
Location: Deventer, The Netherlands
Date: April 22, 2013
Media: White pastel pencil on black paper, colorized and mirror reversed with Photoshop

Sunny weather + long lunch break = solar observing!
This afternoon I took 30 minutes to sketch the Sun in h-alpha. It’s been so long since my last solar sketch, I even had to search for the pastels. I made a full disk sketch, the active region AR1726 was large enough so see in detail even at low magnifications. For this sketch I used a 22mm LVW (32x) in my 70mm h-alpha telescope.

Kind regards,
Roel Weijenberg
www.roelblog.nl


Comet PanSTARRS and the 1 Day Old Moon

C/2011 L4 (PanSTARRS) and Crescent Moon
C/2011 L4 (PanSTARRS) and Crescent Moon

On the evening of March 12, 2013, I was treated to a pleasant view of the 1.26 day old Moon (1.8% illuminated) and comet C/2011 L4 Pan-STARRS from 07:00pm to 07:20pm local time Mesa, Arizona. I had an excellent view of the clear western sky and I could see the comet naked eye about 6.5 diameters to the south of the Moon.

To assist in making the rough graphite sketch I used a 5x 50mm finder scope removed from an Orion telescope. After returning home from Arizona to Illinois I made a color drawing from field notes and the graphite sketch. I was planning on a color sketch but the number of colors need and blending seemed too much for the 30 minutes to comet set.

Sketching:

Graphite pencils: 6B, 4B and 2B also black and white pastel pencils on white sketching paper.

Color drawing was made with black and white charcoal pencils and an assortment of color pencils on medium blue paper.

Frank McCabe


Mare Crisium Illuminated on the Young Moon

Mare Crisium

Mare Crisium – Hover mouse over image to view labels

Mare Crisium is that interesting isolated sea on the northeastern side of the visible lunar surface. Not long before beginning the sketch, it became fully illuminated.

The Nectarian Period impact event that formed this feature occurred more than 3.8 billion years ago. The mare portion of the basin is about 500 kilometers across. In the grazing sunlight on the floor, wrinkled ridges were visible. Also on the western floor craters Picard (24 km.), Peirce (19 km.) and Swift (11km.) stood out in the low light. I could see the lighter gray bench lava that partly buried craters here such as Yerkes (37 km.). Tall flat top mountains (massifs) beyond the shore stand at 2-5 kilometers above the sea. Both promontoria Lavinium and Olivium stood out clearly in very brief moments.

Sketching:

For this sketch I used: 400 series black Strathmore Artagain paper 9″x 9″, white and black Conte’
pastel pencils , and Conte’crayons, a blending stump, plastic eraser.
Telescope: 13.1 inch f/ 6 Dobsonian with 6mm (332x)
Date: 2-13 & 14-2013 23:00 – 00:45 UT
Temperature: 1.7°C (35°F)
Weather: clear, calm
Seeing: not good Antoniadi IV
Co longitude: 310.9°
Lunation: 3.69 days
Illumination: 15.7%

Frank McCabe


A Conjunction with Some History

Conjunction of the Moon, Jupiter and Aldebaran
Conjunction of the Moon, Jupiter and Aldebaran

At the last day of October I sketched a beautiful conjunction between the Moon, Jupiter and Aldebaran. The building in the foreground was my holiday-resort (illuminated by a streetlight), a renovated farm from 1669. By chance: in the first months of 1669 Jupiter was also next to Aldebaran in the sky. So the first inhabitants could have witnessed a similar conjunction. To add some more history: the location was less than 10 km from Middelburg, the town where the telescope was invented!

Clear skies

Jef De Wit

Location: Biggekerke, Netherlands (51°29’ N 3°31’ E)
Date and time: 31 October 2012 around 19.30 UT
Equipment: naked eye
Medium: pastel pencils and soft pastels on black paper (A4), Jupiter and Aldebaran were brightened with Paint


Just After Sunset

Just After Sunset - 12 Sketches
Just After Sunset - 12 Sketches

When we sketch the sun, we sketch sunspots or H-alpha. But the most beautiful thing to sketch is a sunrise or sunset. During my 2 weeks holiday in France I observed every day the sky just after sunset. I missed only one day due to rain.

The sky and the trees were sketched with a set of 12 soft pastels. The farm was sketched with pastel pencils. The original drawings are all A4-format. I waited the sun to set behind the trees and started sketching as fast as I could. After 30 minutes I stopped because the sky changes very fast.

I had great difficulty in sketching the trees. The dark green pastel was to light, the black and brown to dark… The second week the result is much better than the first week.

Clear skies
Jef De Wit

Location: Ronnet, France (46°12’ N 2°42’ E)
Date and time: 4-16 august 2012 around 19.00 UT
Equipment: naked eye
Medium: soft pastel and pastel pencils on art paper (A4)


Vallis Schröteri

Vallis Schröteri
Vallis Schröteri

Object name: vallisschröteri
Object type: Lunar Crater
Location: Amsterdam
Date: 8-5-2012
Media: Pastel on black paper

During a very gray period the last weeks, and with no chance to use the telescope, I decided to enhance my sketching skills by sketching some moon craters based on pictures made by others. This one is a sketch of the vallisschröteri area. Made with pastel pencil on black paper.

Clear skies and kind regards

Matthijs Broggel