Crinkled Solar Surface – 21 March 2015

H-Alpha Solar - 21 March2015
H-Alpha Solar – 21 March2015

Aloha,

Todays solar surface showed some interesting features that I tried to capture. There were a lot of long detailed filaments as well as a region to the east that looked like a piece of silk that had been crinkled and then flattened. To the west of this area was a brightening plage, at the moment the brightest region in the observation besides a bright spike on the limb. The prominences to the north were more subtle and dim.

White sketch paper
Grey charcoal, Tombow pencils 2H, 6B
White acrylic paint (plage)
Blending pencil
Photoscape to adjust contrast

60mm Lunt h-alpha 36x
3/21/2015 2010-2035 UT
Seeing Wilson 4/5 Transparency 2/4
Cindy (Thia) L. Krach
Maui, Hawaii


The Sun before Christmas

The Sun before Christmas - December 24, 2014
The Sun before Christmas – December 24, 2014

Hi ASOD:

Objet: Sun
Objet Type: Sun Ha
Location: Panama city, Republic of Panama (Central America)
Date: December 24 , 2014
Media: graphite pencil , white paper and Phto Zone to invert, color tone and text.
Telescope: Meade Coronado PST – H alpha, 40/400.
Ocular: 13mm

The Sun before Christmas

clear skies , Ricardo Schwarz


H-alpha Solar Observation

A solar observation including prominences, a large active region with sunspots and filaments - October 26, 2014
An H-alpha solar observation including prominences, a large active region with sunspots and filaments – October 26, 2014

Aloha!

This week has been fascinating observing the giant sunspot region 2192 making its way across the solar disc. I was working today to demonstrate the details of the intricate swirls of magnetic activity around the sunspot and filament regions. I utilized the Tilting Sun graphic again for this observation though it is reversed from a standard view to demonstrate my view through the eyepiece.

Solar Observation 10-26-14
Maui, Hawaii
h-alpha Lunt PT 60mm 83X
Black paper, white charcoal, black and white oil pencils, wax pencils and watercolor pencils
Tilting Sun graphics added in Photoscape

Cindy (Thia) Krach


H alpha Sun sketch

Active regions, prominences, sunspots and plages on the Sun - September 28, 2014
Active regions, prominences, sunspots and plages on the Sun – September 28, 2014

Object Name Sun
Object Type H alpha with PST, XW-10
Location Tokyo japan
Date 2014/9/28
Media Black/red pencils on a white paper. Contrast adjusted with PC.

This my first submission to the site. I hope it is acceptable.
An M-class flare has erupterd at #2172 about one hour after this sketch. I could already see some active regions between the two sun spots.

Thanks.


H alpha Sun sketches

Solar prominences and plage on and near the limb - September 19th and 20th, 2014
Solar prominences and plage on and near the limb – September 19th and 20th, 2014

Object Name (H alpha Sun )
Object Type (Nice dwarf star)
Location (Artignosc-sur-Verdon, France)
Date (2014/09 – 19 & 20)
Media (graphite pencil, white paper, my digital tool is Paint.net to add colours via layers)
What a bad weather! Even the “day of the night” becomes the “day of the rain”, what a season.
But here around we are not too complaining. For my cloudy friends, I made a couple of solar sketches to prove that the sun still exist !
Both sketches and zooms are done in 30 minutes, at 15:30 UT Sept. 19th and the day after, same period, with my mini-Lunt35T and SWA 10mm EP.
The prominences that rises are damn pretty and clustered around the equator as it should be at the end of a solar cycle.

I wish you all a nice and dark sky !

http://astro.aquarellia.com
Michel Deconinck


The Sun in H-alpha – aquarel technique

The Hydrogen-alpha solar disk on July 25, 2014 using Aquarel pencils on Aquarel paper.
The Hydrogen-alpha solar disk on July 25, 2014 using Aquarel pencils on Aquarel paper.

Date and time: 25th July 2014, UT 15:30
Place: Tarjan, Hungary (Astronomy Camp of the Hungarian Astronomical Association)
Equipment: 35/400 H-alpha Lunt LS35T, 12 mm
I used colour aquarel pencils on special aquarel paper.

Regards,
Judit


First International Sun-Day

First International Sun-Day on June 22, 2014
First International Sun-Day on June 22, 2014
Certificate of Acheivement for the First International Sun-Day June 22, 2014
Certificate of Acheivement for the First International Sun-Day June 22, 2014

First International Sun-Day
· Object Name (International public event)
· Object Type (Sun)
· Location (Varages – Provence France)
· Date (2014 June 22)
· Media (graphite pencil for the sun, water ink and watercolour for the scenery, white paper, Paint.Net to assemble)

This first International sun-day was a good time to show the sun to the public, today in the north hemisphere the day is much longer than the night. The day before, the local radio broadcast make our promotion. With the local association “AAP” (Association – Astronomie – Provence) of Varages we had good time and very nice public. Despite the fact that the sun was quite calm, we can show a very tiny archipelago of sun-spots on the middle of the disk as well as some spots neat the limb. Anyway, the proms make our day; they are much more attractive for the public today.
To sketch the H-alpha part of the sun (here the portion out of the disk) I used a Coronado 60mm refractor with a focal length of 1000mm ; for the inner portion, the disk in Wight Light, I used my 102mm refractor, same focal length with glass objective filter.

http://aap.eklablog.com/
http://astro.aquarellia.com/

Michel Deconinck

I forget to say that :
In the foreground you can see two parabolic solar oven used to cook sausages and eggs for the public


Trying something New with the Sun

The H-alpha Sun - May 9, 2014
The H-alpha Sun – May 9, 2014
Non inverted colors on white paper.
Non inverted colors on white paper.
Inverted
Inverted

Aloha!

I was enjoying the Sun this morning and trying to decide how to represent the most prominent features. Sketching the Sun has just not gotten me the feeling that I can really represent it as well as I would like to as far as colorizing goes. I like using black paper but it isn’t smooth enough whereas plain white paper is. But when I have tried to add color later, it just loses what I see in the scope.

So today I tried a little something different. I like how some inverted blue colors really become the right colors for the Sun. So I put some oil pastel colors to paper & inverted to see what I could use. The nice thing about the oil pastel is I can scratch off small little lines to try to get the details of the solar surface. I had to think in negative to produce the sketch in order to preserve black, white and the different tones of red. This is my 1st attempt using this technique and I am not entirely happy with it but it is a bit of an experiment.

H-alpha Sun
5/9/14
60mm Lunt 88x
Oil Pastel, white permanent pen, white paper, Lyra polycolor pencils, a needle to scratch off the oil pastels to produce dark lines
Inverted with Photoscape software

Cindy (Thia) Krach
Maui. HI


The Sun Is a Star

The Sun Is a Star
The Sun Is a Star

From time to time, with friends, we animate minor scientific events in small Provencal villages.

Today March 19th we were in Varages with the local AAP astro club. Fifty kids and residents came to have a look at our star’s volatile proms in H-alpha and some nice spots archipelago’s in WL. We used 3 refractors, a Lunt 35mm a Coronado 60mm and a classical 102/1000 for the WL. The annexed sketch was done in H-alpha, directly on site, to show to the spectators, what can be seen through our material. In parallel some of our wife’s are trying to explain that our sun is a star.

Clear sky to you all !
http://astro.aquarellia.com/

Michel Deconinck

•Object Name (Sun and event)
•Object Type (Star !…)
•Location (Varages Provence France)
•Date (2014 March 19th)
•Media (graphite pencil for the sun, ink for the audience, white paper)


Plages come, Plages Go…

White Light and H-Alpha Sun - June 30, 2012
White Light and H-Alpha Sun – June 30, 2012

An exciting day under the Sun. Observing with both a Coronado PST h-alpha & white light 8” Dob fitted with a 3.5” solar filter. Sketches were made at the eyepiece(s).

Seeing was good to excellent. After sketching details of the 4 sunspot groups I could readily see with the PST, I noticed one of the plages (bright spots) on the 1513 sunspot brightening intensely. As it brightened the bottom portion (to the South) of the plage developed a greenish/blue hued widening irregularity. There was also a linear band that extended from the widening directly to the center of sunspot 1513. Above the sunspot there appeared a filament which I tried to capture as well in my sketch. Within 5 minutes the dark patch was gone. From some research and asking more experienced friends, I believe I witnessed a solar flare, probably a minor one but still very exciting. I have been observing with the PST for over a month now, but this was a first for me. The plages around all the major sunspots continued to brighten & fade during the observation period, but none to the intensity of 1513. The PST was loaned to me by a friend after my excitement over white light observing. It’s a wonderful instrument showing many features of the Sun not evident in white light solar filters.

Solar prominences on the limb were also detailed today with the larger one appearing as somewhat of a vortex shape, while another more north prominence appeared as a broken loop. I had observed yesterday & did not see this broken loop then.

I moved to white light observing & could see much greater detail in all the sunspots, including many that did not show up well with the PST.

White light filters are primarily for observing details of the photosphere (like sunspots, facule & granulation), where h-alpha narrow bandwidth shows detail in the chromosphere. The chromosphere or “sphere of color” is the second of the three main layers in the Suns atmosphere and is roughly 2,000 kilometers deep. It sits just above the photosphere, and below the corona.

I am in love with the ever changing face of the sun. I am sometimes tired at night by the time the sky clears but the morning is always mine!

Coronado PST 40mm
9mm Plossl 44X

8” Dob w/ masked 3.5” Astro Baader Solar filter (homemade)
25mm Plossl 48X

4,000 ft elevation
Maui, Hawaii

Aloha!

(Cyn) Thia Krach


Solar h-alpha, Prominences – May 3, 2012

H-Alpha Sun - Full Disc - May 3, 2012
H-Alpha Sun - Full Disc - May 3, 2012

2012 05 03, 1845 UT – 2130 UT.
Solar h-alpha, Prominences and NOAAs 1469, 1471, 1472, 1473, 1474.

PCW Memorial Observatory, Texas – Erika Rix,
Temp: 33°C, winds SE 7 mph, occasional light cirrus,
Seeing: Wilson 2-3, Transparency: 4/6, 50x,
DS 60mm Maxscope, LXD75, Baader Planetarium Hyperion 8-24mm Mark III .

Sketch created scope-side with black Strathmore Artagain paper, white Conte’ crayon and pencil, Derwent charcoal pencil, black oil pencil.

With five active regions, the Sun made quite an appearance today in spite of the limb. There were a few decent prominences, especially to the eastern hemisphere. My favorite view, though, were magnetic fields surrounding 1471 made apparent by the very thin active region filaments (ARFs). They reached down like fingers from the sunspots in that region. Plage was very intricate and meshed into what I believe was AR 1472.

The quiet region filaments (QRFs) were in abundance in the southern northern hemisphere with a few speckled to the south. AR 1474 seemed a bit washed out with plage and faint darkened areas. There was only slight plage definition and no sunspots observed in h-alpha. I didn’t set up a white light filter today for comparison.

1473 and 1469 were blended together by the plage and many lines of ARFs, including filaments reaching out over the edge for short, bright prominences. Plage was very bright, forming the shape of a tuning fork in 1469. These were impressive sets of active regions when paired up.

This was my first solar observing session since moving to Texas about two and a half weeks ago. With all that took place in preparing the old house for sale and the move to Texas, I’ve been deprived of any observing other than naked eye. It was a relief to be behind an eyepiece once again.

H-Alpha Sun - Prominence - May 3, 2012
H-Alpha Sun - Prominence - May 3, 2012

The Sun Over Nagykanizsa

Hi!

The data of drawing: 07.Jun.2011.
Telescope : Colorado PST.
Observing Location: Nagykanizsa – Hungary, Canis Maior Sun Observatory
(www.nae.hu)

Today I’ve made a h-alpha sketch through with Colorado PST H-Alpha
telescope. The drawing is made between 8:00 an 10:00 UT from
Nagykanizsa Canis Maior Sun Observatory , using a red pastel pencil on
black paper.

The weather was bad. The sky was cloudy. Sun only 1-3 happened upon lawsuits up.
I was not able to finish a drawing. The clouds did not allow it. I
managed to prepare a digital scheme it redrawing.

This digital drawing preparated GIMP 2.6 programs, based on a pastel sketch.

Thank you for it!

Clear Sky !

Tamas Bognar

http://tamasasztro.blogspot.com
http://tamasfoto.blogspot.com/

skype : bognartamas
msn : bognart@gmail.com


New Active Region

2011 05 09, 1429UT-1550UT
Solar NOAA 11203, 11204, ??, 11209, 11208

www.pcwobservatory.com

PCW Memorial Observatory, Zanesville, Ohio USA – Erika Rix
DS 60mm Maxscope, LXD75, 21-7mm Zhumell, ETX70 AT w/tilt plate and white light glass filter.

All sketches done scopeside and flipped in Photoshop to match standard orientation. H-alpha sketch created with black Strathmore Artagain paper, white Conte’ crayon and pencil, Derwent charcoal pencil, black oil pencil. White light sketch created on photocopy paper with 0.5mm mechanical pencil and #2 pencil.

Transparency made it nearly impossible to view prominences at the start of the session with the thin layer of cirrus creating a milky white sky. There were small breaks that allowed me to sketch in some of the detail on a western prominence, that later as the transparency improved, showed an abundance of thin whispy structure that wasn’t captured on paper. By that time, I was already working on a full disk sketch in h-alpha. Seeing was terrific until I started on the white light observation, but had I set up the ETX at the beginning of the session to let the scope adjust to the warmth, it would have been much better by the time I observed with it. As it was, I observed in the observatory for protection of the wind as I view with a shade attached to the objective and wanted to avoid vibration.

There is a possible new active region between 1209 and 1208 that, while observing in white light, had several little spots forming an elliptical shape with pointed ends like a football. I noticed facula around 1208, but the seeing was so bad that I couldn’t make out a definite shape. The umbra of the preceding spot in that region was displaced, as was the preceding spot in 1203. I didn’t notice any sunspots in 1209 during my observation, but that may have been the result of the seeing.

The band of active regions is still putting on a nice show in h-alpha with more-defined plage around them.


Sunspots and Proms, Filaments and Plage

2011 03 08, 1703 UT – 1945 UT
Solar h-alpha, NOAAs 11164, 11165, 11166, 11169, prominence sequence 240 pa (11165)

PCW Memorial Observatory, Zanesville, Ohio USA – Erika Rix
www.pcwobservatory.com
Temp: 16.8°C, Humidity 34%, SE winds 8mph
Seeing: Wilson 3.5 w/moments of 1, Transparency: 1-2/6
Alt: 44.5°- 36.4°, Az: 168.1°- 221.1°

DS 60mm Maxscope, LXD75, 21-7mm Zhumell

H-alpha sketch created scopeside with black Strathmore Artagain paper, white Conte’ crayon and pencil, Derwent charcoal pencil, black oil pencil.

It was a nice surprise to see the Sun out and the thin clouds scattered enough for a solar session, especially with 4 active regions present. I didn’t pull out a white light filter. It certainly would have made a great comparison to the h-alpha views with all the sunspots scattered about. The fibrils in NOAA 11166 were outstanding and plentiful, reaching out through plage in wide arcs. 11164 looked etched near the limb with stark contrast between the filaments and plage.

It was 11165 that kept most of my attention today with its area of prominence changing so rapidly that I’m fairly certain portions of it erupted and then collapsed on itself. Two times sections had broken free and floated off. During those times, a sketch was completed every 5-10 minutes.

I would have liked to have stayed out for at least a few more hours, but the transparency became too horrendous to pull detail out of the prominences and full overcast skies was soon to follow.


Sunspots On the Edge

Hallo

Here´s some further information

Object Name: sunspot complex 1161-1162
Object Type: sunspot
Location: Tale, Austria
Date: 23.2.2011
Media: pencil on white paper, digital work done with “Gimp 2”
Equipment: Skywatcher Equinox 100/900ED with Baader Herschel Wedge, Baader Maxbright Binoviewer and 18mm Baader Genuine Ortho eyepieces

Seeing was moderate, therefore 130x was the highest possible magnification. Some nice lightbridges near the umbra of the bigger sunspot caught my attention.

Kind regards
Michael


The Sun from Trondheim City

Hey!

I send you an observation of the sun seen in H-alfa. The sun was seen between drifting clouds.
There was most activity near the south-western limb. This sketch is raw and directly made at
the telescope.
I was home to a friend with a 50 mm refractor just outside Trondheim city, Norway.
I used white paper, graphite and colour pencil.
This is my first try to sketch the sun seen in H-alfa.
Hope you like it!

Best wishes from Per-Jonny Bremseth.


Calm Before the Storm

Object Name The Sun
Object Type Star
Location Lost Pleiad Observatory, Tucson, AZ
Date July 31, 2010, completed at 1628 UT (9:28 AM local time)
Media HB graphite pencil on plain white paper

Additional information:
This sketch of the sun was completed the day before Active Region 11092 erupted with a C class flare that blew the dark snaking filament near the meridian right off the sun and toward earth. This eruption was responsible for the aurora that have been on display in northern latitudes over the last couple nights of August 3 and 4.

I made the sketch while observing the sun through my Lunt Solar Systems pressure tuned 60mm Hydrogen Alpha scope, and a Baader Hyperion 8-24mm Zoom eyepiece. The sketch took approximately 30 minutes to complete, at which time the sun had an altitude of 47 degrees above the horizon with an azimuth of 98 degrees. Seeing was average, due to high humidity and passing clouds, however, there were enough moments of steady seeing to allow for fine detail to be observed within the active region (AR). AR 11092 contains a very dark and sizable sunspot that is visible even in the hydrogen alpha wavelength. In addition, there are a couple thin filaments on the following (east) side of the AR.

Alan Strauss


Foe of Icarus

I use:
Crayola Cerulean pencil for plage
Crayola Aqua Green pencil for proms
White 20# paper
I scan into photoshop and invert.

Blue skies,

Stephen Ames
270-358-8634 – t
240-376-8634 – f
http://www.AdjustableRateMarketing.com

See your life giving sun in vivid images and art
from observers all over the world at
www.SeeMySunspot.com


The Sun for Riser

2010 July 3, 1853 UT – 1938 UT
Solar h-alpha NOAA 11084
PCW Memorial Observatory, Zanesville, Ohio USA – Erika Rix

DS 60mm Maxscope, LXD75, 21-7mm Zhumell
Temp: 28.8°C, Humidity 57.7%-49%
Seeing: Wilson 4, Transparency: 3/6
Clear, slight breeze, Alt: 65.6°-58.1°, Az: 231.8°-247.3°
H-alpha sketch created scopeside with black Strathmore Artagain paper,
white Conte’ crayon and pencil, black oil pencil, Prang white watercolor
pencil

It appears that I missed seeing a dual pair of CMEs (coronal mass
ejections) on the Sun today. It took at place at 1154 UT. My session
began at 1853 UT. Fantastic footage of it can be seen here by SOHO
coronagraph.
http://www.spaceweather.com/swpod2010/03jul10/cme_c2_big.gif?PHPSESSID=kljak6da6ng8ifu6v1gf6p7ch3

AR 1084 still looks like a spiral galaxy (or a chicken eye with the wide
yellow/pink skin wrinkled around the pupil). A fantastic
filament/prominence reached over the limb in the SW. The filament was
thick and fibrous reaching out to the west and on either end, long and
slender.

Riser, my regular solar buddy, aka 14-year old Rhodesian Ridgeback, took
a pretty hard fall today and had to watch me observe from a distance in
the comfort of the shade at the top of the hill. He’s resting
comfortably now on a very thick duvet. Poor ol’ boy.

Best regards,
Erika Rix
pcwobservatory.com


The Sun in H-Alpha

2010 June 20, 1315 UT ñ 1450 UT,
Solar h-alpha,
PCW Memorial Observatory, Zanesville, Ohio USA – Erika Rix.

DS 60mm Maxscope, LXD75, 21-7mm Zhumell,
H-alpha sketch created scopeside with black Strathmore Artagain
paper, white Conteí crayon and pencil, Derwent charcoal pencil,
black oil pencil.

Temp: 22.9C-29C, Humidity 73%-65%
Seeing: Wilson 5 – 3, Transparency: 5/6 ñ 2/6
Light cirrus, Alt: 35∞-53∞, Az: 087.3∞-104.5∞

Erika Rix


2010 Mar 26 Full Solar Disk

Solar Disc
Solar H-Alpha – AR11057
Sketch and Details by Erika Rix

*2010 March 26, 2033 UT.
Solar h-alpha, AR11057.

PCW Memorial Observatory, Zanesville, Ohio USA – Erika Rix.

DS 60mm Maxscope, LXD75, 21-7mm Zhumell.
H-alpha sketch created scopeside with black Canson paper, white Conte’ crayon and pencil, white Prang watercolor pencil, Derwent charcoal pencil, black oil pencil.

SW prominence at first glance looked detached. Increasing mag and waiting for steady seeing, I could make out fainter portions of the prominence that reached the limb. There were a few brighter prominence regions scattered about, but nothing of great significance, especially after the magnificent NW prominence last week.

AR 11057 stood out immediately with two dark areas and bright plage. Panning the FOV brought out another bright plage area on the WNW area just 10 deg in from limb. This could possibly be a remnant of 11056. Toward the southern-middle of the disk, brighter little clusters of plage scattered the area, as well a plage to the NW about 40 deg in from the limb. There were a few filaments but the one that really caught my eye was a wide V-shaped one to the SE. I had to tweak the Etalons to bring out the full structure of what first appeared as a single line of filament.


A Plethora of Prominences

Sun - Jan 31, 2010
Sun – January 31, 2010
Sketch and Details by Stephen Ames

I use:
Crayola Cerulean pencil for plage
Crayola Aqua Green pencil for proms
White 20# paper
I scan into photoshop and invert.

Blue skies,

Stephen Ames
Hodgenville, KY

See your life giving sun in vivid images and art
from observers all over the world at
www.SeeMySunspot.com


Anatomy of an Active Region

Anatomy of an Active Region

Solar Active Region 11029 on October 25, 2009
Sketch and Details by Stephen Ames

Subject: AR 11029
Crayola Cerulean for plage
Conti White pencil for filament
white 20# paper with Aqua Green disk
I scan into photoshop and invert.

Blue skies,

Stephen Ames

See your life giving sun in vivid images and art
from observers all over the world at
www.SeeMySunspot.com


Full Sun In a Grassy Field

Full Sun In a Grassy Field

Solar h-alpha, AR1023 and 1022: 2009 June 23
Sketch and Details by Erika Rix

2009 June 23, 1500UT – 1625UT
Solar h-alpha and White light, ARs 1023 & 1022
Erika Rix
PCW Memorial Observatory, Zanesville, Ohio USA

H-alpha 1546 UT, DS 60mm Maxscope, LXD75, 21-7mm Zhumell
Temp: 27.7°C
Seeing: Wilson 4.5, Transparency: 5/6
Clear with light cirrus, light breeze N
Alt 52.1 Az 103.5
Sketch created scopeside with black Strathmore Artagain paper, white
Conte’ crayon and pencil, white Prang watercolor pencil, black oil pencil.

White Light Sun

Solar white light, AR1023 and 1022: 2009 June 23, 1621UT
Sketch and Details by Erika Rix

White light 1621 UT, ETX70-AT with tilt plate, 21-7mm Zhumell and 2.5x
SA Barlow
Temp: 30.2°C , Humidity 84%
Seeing: Wilson 2.8, Transparency: 5/6
Clear with light cirrus, winds NE 9mph
Alt 58.5 Az 112.1
Sketch created scopeside with white photocopy paper and #2 pencil.

Solar Comparison

Solar H-alpha and white light comparison: 2009 June 23, 1500UT-1625UT
Sketch and Details by Erika Rix

This morning, I moved the solar rigs outside for better seeing
conditions. After all the rains and then full sun today, the coolness
of the grassy fields would be a significant improvement over the hot
wood and carpet from inside the observatory. It appears my decision was
the correct one because I started the solar session off with h-alpha and
was able to not only increase mags to a 7mm, but used a 2.5x Barlow
toward the end of the
h-alpha session for deeper observing. The seeing became much worse
about an hour later when I began my white light filter observation.

Both active regions were obvious and 1023 almost looked like an “X”
shaped plage with a hint of a spot to the western crook of it. There was
another plage on the other side of that spot with a very prominent
filament reaching to the west, although very small with a more obvious
spot at the eastern start of it. Moving west across the disk, AR1022
was almost a “U” shaped plage resembling a pair of oxen horns with the
way each side of it curved outward.

There were many prominences, all fairly small, but they popped in and
out as I moved the Sun in my FOV for optimum clarity of features.
Speaking of the tilting of the Maxscope’s Etalons, I observed with Alan
Traino at a star party this weekend and had the chance to use a pressure
tuner on their 60mm Lunt h-alpha scope. What a great design! And I was
very impressed with the flat FOV, making it so much easier to pull out
details. Thanks Alan for supplying the scopes for us to try out. Wish
I had had more time to play with the pressure tuning scope as well as
the CaK.

The solar disk was speckled with network details and there were several
filaments, although again, very slender or very small.

The view with the white light filter was a little harder to discern
because of the dramatic change in seeing. Although I got a good focus,
I only had slight moments of seeing to make out a little bit of detail
within AR1023. What first looked like two oblong sunspots in that active
region became two pairs of sunspots. The preceding pair was the larger
with the following pair the smaller. There may have even been a third
little spot in the preceding pair but seeing prevented me from really
honing in on those two sets. There were no faculae that I could make
out, although there was a hint of contrast around both sets of spots as
well a faint line reaching from the preceding to the following pairs.


Intensity, Energy, and Beauty

AR 1019

Solar h-alpha, Active Region 1019 on June 2nd, 2009
Sketch and Details by Deirdre Kelleghan

Active Region 1019
June 2nd 2009
PST 40 mm / 8mm TVP Up scaled by eye
Pastel, and Conte on black paper
11:00 UT

After several months of drawing tiny proms dancing on the solar limb I was thrilled to see an new active region forming. Experimenting with solar drawing is fun because it is a challenge to achieve accurate details as the view is so tiny. Solar granulation as seen in the h alpha is very difficult to depict. I will continue in pursuit of my goal accuracy in observing and depiction. Drawing helps me understand what I am looking at , which in turn helps me in my efforts to understand the sun.

Deirdre


Sunny Delight

Proms 053109

Solar h-alpha, 2009 May 31, 1610UT – 1725UT
Sketch and Details by Erika Rix

2009 May 31, 1610UT – 1725UT
Solar h-alpha, Erika Rix
PCW Memorial Observatory, Zanesville, Ohio USA

DS 60mm Maxscope, LXD75, 21-7mm Zhumell
Sketch created scopeside with black Strathmore Artagain paper, white
Conte’ crayon and pencil, white Prang watercolor pencil, black oil pencil.

Temp: 23°C-24.8°C , Humidity 48%
Seeing: Wilson 3, Transparency: 2/6
Clear with haze, winds N ~8mph
Alt: 59.9, Az: 118.2

Initial impression was a bit of disappointment because the huge
prominence that others are reporting wasn’t apparent to me at the
eyepiece. Later today, that large prominence was reported to have
dissipated by 1600UT, so I believe I had just caught the tail end of
it. It was to the northwest and at 1615UT, all that I could see in that
area with our poor transparency was a faint wisp of a prominence.

There were three areas of plage; one nearly midway across the disk and a
second one to the east, both in the northern hemisphere; and another
small area ~ 150° just inside the southern limb. This southern one
makes me wonder if it could be an ephemeral region. Three fairly
obvious filaments could be seen, the largest nearly reaching the small
prominence at ~190°. The center of the disk was full of the dark
hairlike fractures of fibrils or spicules, making a beautiful scene when
moments of better sky conditions would allow for it.


Plasma Arches on the Western Limb

proms 021309

Solar Prominences on February 13, 2009
Sketch and Details by Erika Rix

2009 Feb 13, 1600UT – 1700UT

Solar prominences in h-alpha, western limb

PCW Memorial Observatory, Zanesville, Ohio USA
Erika Rix

DS 60mm Maxscope, LXD75, 21-7mm Zhumell
Sketch created scopeside with black Strathmore Artagain paper, white Conte’ crayon and pencil, white Prang watercolor pencil.

Temp: 3° C, Humidity 60%
Seeing: Wilson 3, Transparency: poor
Scattered, winds 7mph from NNW
Alt: 34.4, Az: 159.2

Approximately 30° inward from the eastern limb, a crescent-shaped plage was seen with a dark dot during my h-alpha observation. No AR was noted in white light. There were a few proms scattered about to the north and south, but the prominences on the western limb really stood out. At first glance it looked like two detached proms, but adjusting the outer etalon and increasing magnification, that section of limb came alive with prominence structure.

North is to the 4.5 o’clock position and west is the 2.5 o’clock position in my sketch.


Dances on the Solar Limb

Proms 2509

Solar prominences 2009 Feb 05, 1655UT – 1725UT
Sketch and Details by Erika Rix

2009 Feb 05, 1655UT – 1725UT

Solar prominences in h-alpha

PCW Memorial Observatory, Zanesville, Ohio USA
Erika Rix

DS 60mm Maxscope, LXD75, 21-7mm Zhumell
Sketch created scopeside with black Strathmore Artagain paper, white Conte’ crayon and pencil, white Prang watercolor pencil.

Temp: -6.4C, Humidity 49%
Seeing: Wilson 3, Transparency: poor
Mostly clear with thin layers of cirrus, Winds: 3.5mph SSW
Alt: 23.7, Az: 139.1

There was an area that I suspected was a new AR just NW of center while observing in h-alpha. It appeared to have two small plage with a single tiny sunspot to the west of them. After pulling out the ETX70 with a white light filter, all that I could see were moments of visible granulation and there were neither faculae nor pores to be seen.

To the south, in h-alpha, there was a very bright smaller prom with several tiny fingers of proms around it. Heading about 30 degrees west around the limb I noticed a thick medium sized prom that was very faint and the base of it was nearly impossible to see.

On the NW limb were two slender proms that on closer inspection it was obvious that they were actually one intricate arch of a prominence with delicate tendrils attaching at different points within it. A filament was visible to the north of it, nearly reaching to the limb.

Other than a short thick filament to the north about 15 degrees in from the limb, as well as a few tiny proms not already mentioned, I just soaked in the surface view and called it a day.


Learning from NOAA 11003

Solar - AR 11003

Solar NOAA 11003
Sketch and Details by Erika Rix

2008 Oct 05
Solar – featuring SE quadrant and NOAA 11003
Erika Rix, PCW Memorial Observatory, 40.01/-81.56
Observation details:

AR 11003 was not visible to me in white light using my ETX70 with a TV8mm plossl. I did see granulation on and off, transparency isn’t too great today. I almost thought I detected this region briefly, but couldn’t confirm it.

In h-alpha using my Maxscope, the area was lit up very nicely by bright slender plage making some of the background around it appear darker in comparison to the rest of the disk. I didn’t see any sunspots within the active region.

There were many prominences scattered around the limb and a very short, almost spot-like filament in the southern hemisphere west of the AR.
Sketch details:

This case is a perfect example of getting carried away with fitting in all the details and then losing touch on size and contrast. The active region was smaller in real life and a little further away from the limb. I continued on with the sketch anyway, marking the error in my report and off to the side of the sketch, since it was still an accurate representation of the AR within itself.

The prominence set on the limb is accurate in size, but I rendered it too bright, again getting carried away with my markings while trying to mark in the details within the prom.

Even though I’ve made the errors, I’ve marked them accordingly and still have a successful sketch from my observation. I say successful because I’ve still achieved my goals of in depth study of the Sun through sketching and managing to record my observations of these features regardless of two areas of errors that I stated. Sometimes sketching can be like patting your head and rubbing your belly at the same time. The results can make you giggle, but you still trying your hand at it.

I grabbed the black paper closest to me today, so that was the Artagain paper. White Conte’ chalk, Conte’ pencil, and white Prang pencil were for the white areas. Contrast added with a stick of charcoal and a black pen. No erasing was done and blending of the solar surface was done with my finger tips. No blending was done after that.

I added a -15 brightness after taking a photo of my sketch with my Rebel outside in diffused lighting. My new scanner is still giving me fits scanning in my sketches, so I find it easier to take photos of them until I can master the new machine. Taking a little more time out of my day than I should have for fun, I managed white light and h-alpha viewing.


Soaring Across the Solar Aviary

Sun H-Alpha

Sun (H-Alpha)
Sketch and Details by Ernest Shekolyan

Hi!

That is my picture of Sun on 7 May 2007 (13:40 msc). PST Coronado + 10 mm Super (Synta).
Interesting features: bird-like active chromispheric flash in center of solar disc and a number prominences on the limb. Graphite pencil, white paper, then photocopy and processing in ACDSee (coloring, soft, some additional manual drawing).

Sincerely yours, Ernest Shekolyan


May 4, 2008 Solar Collage

Sun

H-Alpha Sun
Sketch and Details by Erika Rix

PCW Memorial Observatory, Zanesville, Ohio, USA, Lat: 40.01 / Long: -81.56

Erika Rix

Temp: 54.0°F / 12.2 °C
Winds: 5.8 mph NW, clear turning to partly cloudy
Humidity: 53%
Seeing: very poor 2/6
Transparency: 4/6

Equipment:
Internally double stacked Maxscope 60mm, LXD75, 40mm ProOptic Plossl, 21-7mm Zhumell, ETX70AT, 8mm TV Plossl

Sketch Media:
H-alpha – Black Strathmore Artagain paper, white Conte’ and Prang pencils, white vinyl eraser.

White light pores created in Photoshop.

New active region in the ESE quadrant was visible with two crescent shaped plage facing each other during the h-alpha observing session. In white light, seeing was very poor making it invisible at first glance. Eventually my eyes were able to see two dark specks in the AR, appearing to be only umbrae, with the more easterly one slightly darker and thicker.

No faculae were noted in white light.

Of the prominence activity in h-alpha, the long line of southern prominences had filament reaching out over the disk on the far western edge. The large eastern edged prom in this line was leaning at a crook to the east (right) in my FOV. It was also the faintest of the four more prominent prominences around the Sun’s limb.


The Makings of a Coronal Mass Ejection

Sun

Sun-White Light

Sun – Featuring NOAA 10987, 10988, 10989
Sketches and Commentary by Erika Rix

2008 March 26, 1335ST – 1452ST (1735UT – 1852UT)
Solar H-alpha and White Light
PCW Memorial Observatory, Zanesville, Ohio, USA, Lat: 40.01 / Long: -81.56
Erika Rix

Temp: 57.0 °F / 13.9 °C
Winds: West 18 mph gusting to 25 mph
Humidity: 33%
Seeing: 5/6
Transparency: 2/6
Alt: 50.4 Az: 157.5

Equipment:
Internally double stacked Maxscope 60mm, LXD75, 40mm ProOptic Plossl, 21-7mm Zhumell
ETX70 AT, tilt plate, 8mm Televue Plossl

Sketch Media:
H-alpha – Black Strathmore Artagain paper, white Conte’ and Prang pencils, white vinyl eraser.
Added –5 brightness, +30 contrast after scanning in color at 300 dpi. Tilting Sun program used for digital Sun insert.

White Light – white copy paper, #2 pencil, .5mm mechanical pencil, photographed sketch instead of scanning for better contrast.

It was said that today NOAA 10989 produced an M2-class eruption causing a CME. I have to say that each of the three active regions had very bright plage seeming to curve around the dark specks of sunspots within each region. It’s not often I get such a great view of the sunspots themselves in h-alpha, but today 10988 had the largest umbral area and they all had one or two smaller dark spots. I could hardly wait to pull out the ETX70 with a white light filter to see the sunspots themselves in much greater detail.

Prom activity was very modest. After 3-4 strolls around the limb tweaking the Etalon, 6 areas of very small prominences came to view. The filaments on the disk were showy, especially the large blotchy one to the south of 10988.

With the white light filter, facula was clearly viewable around 10989, reaching out in several directions. Penumbrae were seen in most of the sunspots. I had hoped to increase magnification for a closer view, but with transparency becoming worse, as well as viewing in white light in the front yard rather then in the protection of the observatory, the white light view was already too soft. Increasing magnification would have made it impossible.