Lunar Crater Plato

Crater Plato
Crater Plato

Please find attached a sketch of the lunar crater Plato and its environs….I used soft graphite pencils to do the sketch on cartridge paper. The colours were then inverted on the computer. This sketch is based on a number of observations I have made of Plato in the last year. I use a Meade LX90 GPS telescope. It has an aperture of 203mm. Plato is one of my favourite regions on the Moon as I love how the crater is filled with deep shadows when the sun is at a low angle. I also have a website with more of my photographic work at Photos of Weather.

My name: Kiran
Object Name: Plato
Object Type: Lunar Crater
Location: South East United Kingdom
Date of Sketch: 14th June 2015
Media: Graphite Pencils
Equipment: LX90 GPS (8 inch aperture)
Website: www.photosofweather.com

Many thanks
Kind Regards

Kiran


Crater Davy and its Crater Chain in Davy Y

Crater Davy
Crater Davy

Crater Davy (35 km.) and the Davy crater chain (catena) were my targets for this evening of sketching and although the seeing and transparency were predicted to be above average that was not the case.
The Davy crater chain is 45-50 km. in extent. It arcs across the floor and eastern rim of crater Davy Y (70 km.). Since it does not line up with any impacts of note it is not likely a sequence of secondary craters. There is also no evidence of volcanic activity associated with this chain. Robert Wichman and Charles A. Wood as well as H. J. Melosh and E. A. Whitaker believe that a comet (or asteroid) may be responsible as it broke up while inside the Earth’s roche limit. As it went in on the moon like a train of meteors it would have created a chain of impacts. A paper published in 1994 by Melosh and Whitaker explains the hypothesis.

Crater Chains on the Moon: Records of Comets Split by the Earth’s Tides?; H. J. Melosh and E. A. Whitaker, Lunar and Planetary Lab, University of Arizona, Tucson, Az.

Sketching:

Black Artagain paper, white and black Conte’ pastel pencils, white Pearl eraser, blending stumps

Telescope 13.1” f/6 Dobsonian telescope on an equatorial drive platform at 332x with 6mm eyepiece

Date: 03-29-2015, 00:00 – 03:00 UT


Temperature: -5°C (24° F) clear, calm

Seeing: Variable, Antoniadi III(fair)-IV (poor)

Colongitude: 11.6 °

Lunation: 8.4 days

Illumination: 64.7 %



Frank McCabe

Crater Davy - Labeled
Crater Davy – Labeled

Posidonius

Posidonius
Posidonius

Hi folks, this is a sketch of the moon crater Posidonius.

It’s a nice crater 100km diam. at the East border of Mare Derenitatis, beside Lacus Somniorum. To the West, the light line is Dorsa Sirnov.
Adjacent to Posidonius is crater Chacornac ( 54km Diam.) and on the other side, Danelli ( 28 km diam).
Posidonius is somehow like Gassendi , ( Gerald North: Observing the Moon)

Posidonius es un bonito cráter de 100 km de diámetro en el límite Este del Mare Serenitatis junto al Lacus Somniorum.
Junto a él, el cráter Chacornac ( 50,4km de diámetro) y al otro lado, el cráter Danielli ( 28 km diámetro).
Al oeste , la Dorsa Smirnov que es esa línea clara justo en el Terminador.
El cráter Posidonius tiene un aire familiar que recuerda a Gassendi, tanto en tamaño como en fisonomía ( Gerald North: Observing the Moon)

Regards,
Aurelio

___________________
Aurelio Alcalde


Sinus Iridum

Sinus Iridum
Sinus Iridum

Object Name: Sinus Iridum
Object Type: Moon zone
Location: Bolaños de Calatrava, Spain
Date: 30-03-2015
Media: graphite pencil, white paper

Telescope: SkyWatcher Evostar 90/900
Eyepiece: SkyWatcher UWA 7mm
Seeing: 3

Hi, this was my second drawing of the moon. It took me a long time to finish it but I couldn’t resist to draw the most beautiful part of our satellite in my opinion.


Sirsalis & Damoiseau Craters

Sirsalis & Damoiseau Craters
Sirsalis & Damoiseau Craters

Aloha,

I submit my most recent lunar sketch of Sirsalis & Damoiseau Craters at the western limb of the moon. What a wonderful area to explore with interesting concentric craters of Damoiseau & the double crater of Sirsalis at this angle of light. Unseen Grimaldi is in the darkness to the west.

Object: Lunar craters Sirsalis & Damoiseau @ ~13 days lunation
Telescope: 12.5” Portaball 9mm Nagler 169X
Location: Maui Hawaii, 4000 ft elevation
Date: 2/4/12 7:45pm
Medium: Black art paper, white & black charcoal

Thia Krach


Triad of Craters

Theophilus ,Cyrillus and Catharina
Theophilus ,Cyrillus and Catharina

Hello Artist of the nightsky! How are you? i come after long time and many problems,in my family and out….
But i not stopped my asketch activity.
I follow yours splendid works always……
i return to asod with my last Moon sketch made with my old Refractor Kenko 80/1000.
The sky was clear and i take my telescope and placed it on my roof in front my home.
The image was perfect,still and my eies was concentrated to tryade of craters: Theophilus ,Cyrillus and Catharina.
I see many shadow and particulars of surface……incredible show!!
I hope like you!
Ciao! Giorgio.

Site: Pergola,Marche,Center Italy.
Date: 24-25 April 2015
Moon phase: Crescent (6,9 days)
Instrument: Refractor Kenko 80/1000
eyepiece: 15mm + Barlow
Magnification: 133x
Seeing:Perfect,not at the end cause Moon very low
Temperature: Little cold,not wind.
Media: Graphite pencil on white paper Fabriano for sketches


Apollo 15 Landing Site

Apollo 15 Landing Site
Apollo 15 Landing Site

Apollo 15 Landing Site
Last evening proved to be a fine night for observing the Moon and the planets. The atmosphere at sunset settled down to a Pickering 8/10 and 9/10 for brief intervals. This was predicted so I had two telescopes outside (my 18 inch f/4.9 and 13.1 inch f/6 both Dobsonians). At 373x using the 18 inch scope I could clearly see the floor of Palus Putredinis (The Marsh of Decay) and not far away Rima Hadley at the foot of Montes Apenninus. I spent a 3 hour interval on this sketch but actual sketching time was more like 2 hours. The sketch was done using the smaller scope because it is driven. 4 mm and 6 mm eyepieces gave me magnifications of 499x and 333x and occasionally I used the 18 inch scope to verify some of the meanders of Hadley rille and other small features. I have marked the landing site (red dot) of Apollo 15 Lunar Landing Module which occurred the summer of 1971, a very exciting time for the US space program.
Craters visible in this sketch include Hadley C 6 km. in diameter and Aratus (10 km.).

Sketching:
For this sketch I used: Gray sketching paper, 9”x 11”, white and black Conte’ pastel pencils and blending stumps.
Telescopes: 13.1 inch f/ 6 Dobsonian and 18 inch F/4.9, eyepieces : 4mm, 6mm

Date: April 29, 2015 01:00-04:00 UT
Temperature: 4.4°C (40°F)
Clear, calm
Seeing: Pickering 8.5
Transparency: 4/5
Co longitude: 29.9°
Lunation: 10 days
Illumination: 75.9 %
Frank McCabe

Apollo 15 Landing Site - Labeled
Apollo 15 Landing Site – Labeled

Posidonius Crater

Posidonius Crater
Posidonius Crater

Hi all,

yesterday evening just before the altocumulus clouds of the approaching depression covered the sky, I could do another sketch of the moon: This time it was crater Posidonius and its surroundings.

Ah, by the way, this time I tried a new pen: For the bright areas (e. g. the western rims of Posidonius A and J), I took a whitecoal pen instead of chalk pen. That provided much brighter contrast.

Another novelty for me: I didn’t use a diagonal but an Amici prism, so that the view in the eyepiece wasn’t mirrored at all. The view was a bit less bright, but for the moon it’s still bright enough.

Object Name: Posidonius
Object Type: Lunar Crater
Location: Germany, Dusseldorf area
Date: 2015-04-24, 2130-2205 CEST
Media: chalk pastel pencil, whitecoal pencil and charcoal pencil on black sketching cardbox
Telescope: Celestron Nexstar 127 SLT
Eyepiece: TS HR Planetary 7mm

Clear skies

Achim


Sunrise at Mare Crisium

Mare Crisium
Mare Crisium

Hi,

find attached a charcoal and pastel sketch of the sunrise at Mare Crisium. I hope you like it.

Object Name: Mare Crisium, eastern part
Object Type: Lunar Maria
Location: Germany, Dusseldorf area
Date: 2015-03-22, 2020-2100 CET
Media: chalk pastel pencil and charcoal pencil on black sketching cardbox
Telescope: Celestron Nexstar 127 SLT
Eyepiece: TS HR Planetary 7mm

Clear skies

Achim


Craters Diophantus and Delisle

Craters Diophantus and Delisle
Craters Diophantus and Delisle
Craters Diophantus and Delisle - Labeled
Craters Diophantus and Delisle – Labeled

On the western side of Mare Imbrium are craters Diophantus (19 km.) and Delisle (25 km.) with mons Delisle in between and closer to the crater of the same name. A dorsum or ridge here is perhaps a buried crater rim and creates a sharp edge curving demarcation on the terminator side of the Moon at the time of sketching. Some of the massifs in this region such as mons La Hire (1.5 km. high), mons Vinogradov (1.4 km.) and mons Delisle( 0.8km. high) are described by some geologists as likely left over remnants from the rings of the Imbrium impact. Additional craters seen at this observation included Euler (2.8 km.), Artsimovich (9 km.), Gruithuisen (17 km.) and Heis (15 km.)and numerous smaller unnamed.

Sketching:

For this sketch I used: black Strathmore 400 Artagain paper, 9”x 12”, white and black Conte’pastel pencils, a soft charcoal pencil, brush and a blending stump.

Telescope: 13.1 inch f/6 Dobsonian and 9mm eyepiece 221x
Date: 01-31-2015, 03:10 – 04:25 UT
Temperature: -7°C (20°F)
clear, breezy
Seeing: Antoniadi III
Co longitude: 38.7°
Lunation: 10.33 days
Illumination: 84.9 %
Phase: 45.8°

Frank McCabe


Moon at 2 Day Lunation

Moon - 22 March 2015
Moon – 22 March 2015

This sketch is one of the renderings I am doing for the Astro League’s Sketching Award Program. The moon was in Aries as it was setting over the Pacific. I was able to get some of Mare Crisium. This was done at the Haleakala Amateur Astronomers’ site at the summit of Haleakala this past Sunday, March 22. 2015. I viewed it with my C925/CGEM on a pier with a 2″ Swan 40mm EP at 58X.


Lunar Crater Gassendi

Crater Gassendi - 31 January 2015
Crater Gassendi – 31 January 2015

Hi all,

tonight I had a look outside and – yeah, no clouds and clear skies.

So I took out the 10″ f/5 truss dobsonian and prepared for lunar sketching: Today the floor-fractured crater Gassendi attracted me and presented nice central peaks and its rimae on its ground.

Telescope: 10″ f/5 Martini Dobsonian

Eyepiece: Skywatcher Planetary 5mm

Date & Time: Jan 31st, 2015 / 1925-2015 CET

Place: home terrace, Dusseldorf region, Germany

Technique: chalk, charcoal and white pastel on black sketching cardbox paper

Hope you like the sketch.

Clear skies!

Achim


Bullialdus y Compañía

Bullialdus Crater - 29 January 2015
Bullialdus Crater – 29 January 2015

Object Name: Bullialdus cráter and company
Object Type: Lunar crater
Location : Granadero Baigorria, Santa Fe, Argentina
Date 29 – 01 – 15
Media: Pencil HB, 2B , 4B , Blending stump, white paper and Software Paint.NET to invert colours and minor details

This crater is located in the western part of Nibium Sea. It has a dimension of approximately 60 x 60 km . It is accompanied by Bullialdus A and Bullialdus B, two craters considerably smaller.Like the idea was to draw the area , you can see the KONIG crater (20 x 20 km), which is a little more to the west, and LUBINETZKY crater . The observation was made with NW telescope Sky watcher 150/750, with a TMB II 5 eyepiece


Western Highland Peninsula Craters

Western Highland Peninsula Craters
Western Highland Peninsula Craters

For those that observe and sketch the Moon, trying to pick targets just before, just at and just after first quarter can be much fun because there are so many choices in good relief. On this occasion I chose two large walled plain craters near the terminator. Albategnius (129 km.) the younger of the two ancient craters and further from the terminator it was displaying its central peak (1.5km. tall) and large crater Klein (44 km.) on its rim. Crater Halley (36 km.) to the northeast is notably a kilometer deeper than Klein and although further from the terminator has a completely shadowed floor with that greater depth.

The other large crater Ptolemaeus (154km.) was on the terminator at the beginning of my sketch.
With the sun so low the rim shadows were long and were creating a special effect. In combination with the rim shadow of little crater Ammonius (8.5 km.) I could see old Nesse. Jim Adlhoch describes the floor shadow as looking like the head and neck of the Loch Ness monster- see Lunar Photo of the Day September 4, 2014.
http://lpod.wikispaces.com/September+4%2C+2014
Crater Ptolemaeus has a floor covered with many shallow bowl shaped craters, ghosts buried under lava. These ghost craters can be seen at low sun but the central peak is completely absent. To the north is crater Herschel (41 km.) with a shadowed floor.

Western Highland Peninsula Craters
Western Highland Peninsula Craters

Sketching:
For this sketch I used: Black Canson sketching paper, 10”x10”, white and black Conte’ pastel pencils and blending stumps.

Telescope: 13.1 inch f/ 6 Dobsonian and 9 mm eyepiece 222x
Date: 01-28-2015 00:05-02:00 UT
Temperature: -4°C (25°F)
Clear, calm
Seeing: Antoniadi II
Transparency: 4/5
Co longitude: 0.7°
Lunation: 7.20 days
Illumination: 56.1 %

Frank McCabe


Comparison of Two Sketches of Atlas and Hercules

Atlas and Hercules
Atlas and Hercules

Yesterday evening I could sketch the wonderful pair of craters Atlas and Hercules with charcoal and chalk on black cardbox. This was the second sketch I did of these craters. I had a look into my archive and compared the current sketch with the one done on May last year.

Both sketches have been done with my 5” Celestron MAK. What we can see is the different lighting conditions based on moon age and libration. Furthermore, the seeing conditions last time have been much better than yesterday – I could not go up to 300x yesterday but had to leave it with the 7mm EP.

Clear skies!

Achim


Height of Lunar Features

The measurement of the height of lunar features by measuring the length of the cast shadows - December 28, 2014
The measurement of the height of lunar features by measuring the length of the cast shadows – December 28, 2014

Lunar Features at First Quarter
Lunar Craters and Montes
Dunboyne, County Meath, Ireland
28/12/2014
Graphite pencils plain paper

This is a sketch I did as part of an assignment for an Astronomy course I am taking for fun. The exercise was to calculate 4 lunar features heights by making accurate sketch observations, measuring the shadows and calculating the height using the distances along with the Earth-Sun-Moon angles. It just happened to be clear at exactly first quarter. I am having trouble sketching a very dark black and new to many of the sketching techniques and making it up as I go along. Is there an extra dark lead past an 8b or should I be looking sketch on black paper? I am also having problems scanning and am taking photos of my sketches? Any help appreciated. Clear Skies! Kevin


Vallis Schröteri

Vallis Schröteri, a huge lava vent and rille system on the Aristarchus Plateau - January 2, 2015
Vallis Schröteri, a huge lava vent and rille system on the Aristarchus Plateau – January 2, 2015

Hi,

find attached a charcoal and pastel sketch of Aristarchus, Herodotus and the famous Vallis Schröteri. I hope you like it.

Object Name: Vallis Schröteri, Aristarchus, Herodotus
Object Type: Lunar Valley and Crater
Location: Germany, Dusseldorf area
Date: 2015-01-02, 1800-1845 CET
Media: chalk pastel pencil and charcoal pencil on black sketching cardbox
Telescope: Martini 10” f/5 Dobsonian
Eyepiece: Skywatcher HR Planetary 5mm
Clear skies!

Achim


Big Bowl of Pythagoras

Lunar crater Pythagoras - January 3, 2015
Lunar crater Pythagoras – January 3, 2015

Object Name – Pythagoras
Object Type – Lunar impact crater
Location – Deventer, The Netherands
Date – Januari 3, 2015
Media – White pastel pencil on black paper

So far this winter is terrible for astronomy. Nothing but clouds and rain in the Netherlands… But yesterday evening the skies finally cleared and my 3″ Polarex Unitron was quickly set up in the backyard. Crater Pythagoras on the northeastern limb of the Moon looked particularly nice – like a deep rocky bowl in the lunar surface. Seeing conditions were fair, so I pumped up the magnifcation to a crazy (for a 3″) 200x. It still gave a pleasant and sharp view and sketching was quite comfortable with the crater looking big in the eyepiece.

Pythagoras is a 130km wide impact crater with staggering 5km high terraced walls. The central peaks (I could see two of them) are also pretty huge: 3,5km high! Imagine the panoramic view from the top op one of those mountains….

Sketch made with a pastel pencil on black paper, through a 3″ Polarex Unitron at 200x (Baader 6mm BGO). The image is mirror reversed.

Clear Skies,
Roel Weijenberg
www.roelblog.nl


Lunar crater Maurolycus

Lunar crater Maurolycus and environs - December 28, 2014
Lunar crater Maurolycus and environs – December 28, 2014

Hi,

here we go with a chalk/charcoal sketch of lunar crater Maurolycus.
Object Name: Maurolycus
Object Type: Lunar Crater
Location: Germany, Dusseldorf area
Date: 2014-12-28, 1650-1720 CET
Media: chalk pencil and charcoal pencil on black sketching cardbox
Telescope: Martini 10” f/5 truss tube dobsonian
Eyepiece: TS HR Planetary 7mm

Clear Skies!

Achim


Gassendi, Rimae Mersenius and Rupes Liebig at the terminator

Mare Humorum including Gassendi, Rimae Mersenius and Rupes Liebig at the terminator - December 2, 2014
Mare Humorum including Gassendi, Rimae Mersenius and Rupes Liebig at the terminator – December 2, 2014
Gassendi, Rimae Mersenius and Rupes Liebig at the terminator labeled
Gassendi, Rimae Mersenius and Rupes Liebig at the terminator labeled

Aloha!

This was one of those nights things just fall together. Excellent seeing and light enough from the Moon that I could see the paper well. After finishing my sketch at the eyepiece I went inside to clean it up and was pleasantly surprised that I liked it pretty much the way it was.

110km wide Gassendi Crater showed some excellent roughened floor details with hummocks casting shadows as well as floor rilles illuminated as bright & dark lines. Rima Mersenius is brilliantly lit on the terminator and the bright scarp of Rupes Liebig can be seen at the base of the wall.

Gassendi Crater, Mersenius Rille, Rupes Liebig, Mare Humorum @11.7 days lunation
.12/2/14 2030-2140 HST
12.5″ Portaball, 227x
Canson Black paper and white and black Conte’ Crayon, white charcoal pencil
Photoscape to adjust contrast

Cindy (Thia) Krach
Haleakala Amateur Astronomers
Maui, Hawaii


Schiller

Lunar crater Schiller and environs - August 6, 2014
Lunar crater Schiller and environs – August 6, 2014

Hello,

Crater Schiller

Object Type: Moon

Location: Tarragona – Spain

Schiller crater formation is still unknown, but one of the most plausible theory argue that due to an impact of a small asteroid or comet fragmented with a small impact angle.

While I was observing and drawing this beautiful crater, I imagined what it would have been to observe the crash and its immediate aftermath. Actually, the moon never disappoints.

For more details of my observation you can visit my blog:

http://laorilladelcosmos.blogspot.com.es/2014/12/schiller.html

Date and Time: 2014-08-06, 21h 58m UT

Telescope: SC Celestron 235mm (9.25″); CGEM mount.

Eyepiece: 7.5mm (313x)

White paper, HB2 graphite pencil, and scanned with Photoshop

Seeing: 4/5 (5 the best)

Transparency: Clear. Rural skies.

Thank you and best regards.


Taoism on an Anomalous Lunar Phase Night

Lunar mountains as they appear along the limb - December 6, 2014
Lunar mountains as they appear along the limb – December 6, 2014
Anomalous December 6, 2014 libration illustrated
Anomalous December 6, 2014 libration illustrated

The night on December 6 , 3;00-4;00 am was great to observe the 15day moon.

After study some pdf Taurus-Littrow Valley ,NASA, in web, l looked through the eyepieces and soon l found the position of the 15day lunar shade terminator was wrong and strangely for, l remember the lunar phases on 15day moon were always [East-West]ward apparent, this time it was anomalously [North-South] ward.

l think it was not because by libration definitely but by some unknown force pushed the moon downward against the flat normal orbital plane of moon-earth system. l was so tired that night that l had only one hour observation not enough time to check how the limb shade was changing even l could’nt sketch reasonably well the old China or Korean Taoism like landscape and this magnificent similarly scenery was stretched along the limb almost 350km long and of course my limitation was only 70km span , yes-, l have also experienced the Grand Canyon like scenery once with the 8′ og in Dec 2013, twice was recently with the 13″ og 1.5months ago. Now is a Taoism scene.

—————-

320mm homemade refractor x420

2014, 12. 6th

Transparecy,seeing together superb ,8/10;.8/10

White paper, graphite pencils, black acrilic

Shot with a Olympus d-camera

K.S.Min S. Korea


Mooncrater – Thebit

The Lunar crater Thebit - November 1, 2014
The Lunar crater Thebit – November 1, 2014

Hello,

in this night I used my TMB 115/805 to observe the moon.

After half an hour (I have started around 19:00 clock) I decided to hold the crater “Thebit” for my log. Partly it has not occurred to me somehow and I took more than an hour before I could go on for fine work. The proportions did not want to go out of hand and the many subtleties difficult to carry auf’s paper today. Everything was pretty numb, pins “dashed” strange and haze-winding soaked the paper so that it rippled.

All in all I am very happy to have seen it. It was a great Show.

CS Uwe

Date: 01.November 2014
Object: Moon
Object Name: Crater Thebit
Telescope: 115/805 TMB
Eyepiece: 3,5 mm Nagler
Magnification: about 230x
Location: Near Tauberbischofsheim Germany


Surprise Libration

The lunar crater Gauss and environs seen in different librations on January 16, 2014 and December 8, 2014
The lunar crater Gauss and environs seen in different librations on January 16, 2014 and December 8, 2014

Last night I made a sketch of Lunar crater Gauss and its surroundings. While archiving the sketch this morning I realised I already sketched this part of the Moon almost a year ago, so I got the idea of a side by side comparison to show the effect of lunation. To my surprise I found out these sketches were made at the exact same lunation: 15.5 days. The difference in lighting therefore had to be caused mainly by the Moon’s libration; the slow wobbling of the Moon in its orbit. A pleasant suprise to find out I sketched this phenomenon totally unintentionally!

Both sketches were made using a 3″ Polarex Unitron refractor at 171x, with a white pastel pencil on black paper. Orientation and size were matched using Photoshop.

Object Name: Gauss
Object Type: Lunar crater, libration
Location: Deventer, The Netherlands
Date: December 8, 2014
Media: white pastel pencil, black paper

Clear skies!
Roel Weijenberg
www.roelblog.nl


Craters Billy and Hansteen

Lunar craters Billy and Hansteen with the mountain Mons Hansteen - December 4, 2014
Lunar craters Billy and Hansteen with the mountain Mons Hansteen – December 4, 2014
Billy, Hansteen and Mons Hansteen labeled
Billy, Hansteen and Mons Hansteen labeled

Craters Billy and Hansteen

It has been cold in Chicagoland and although it was sunny most of the day, high cirrus clouds moved in after sunset to block out all stars fainter than 3rd magnitude. Ice crystals at high altitude generated a colorless halo around the Moon. Not the best conditions for sketching but the first chance in 4 weeks for me. My target for this sketch was the pair of craters at the southern edge of Oceanus Procellarum. Crater Billy (46 km.) with its dark smooth lava covered floor and crater Hansteen (45 km.) with its hilly, irregular floor and terraced walls present contrasting looking craters of similar size and age. Between these craters is a large arrowhead shaped volcanic extrusion feature called Mons Hansteen. This object always looks very bright at or near full Moon.

Sketching:

Black Canson paper, white and black Conte’ pastel pencils, white Pearl eraser, blending stumps
Telescope 13.1” f/6 Dobsonian telescope on an equatorial drive platform at 222x with 9mm eyepiece

Date: 12-04-2014, 02:00 – 03:00 UT


Temperature: -7°C (20° F) 
mostly cloudy, calm

Seeing: Antoniadi IV (poor)

Colongitude: 54.2 °

Lunation: 11.4 days

Illumination: 92.5 %



Frank McCabe


Capuanus Crater and Lacus Timoris

Lunar crater Capuanus on the shores of the Lake of Fear - December 1, 2014
Lunar crater Capuanus on the shores of the Lake of Fear – December 1, 2014

Aloha!

I have been lucky enough to have clear skies the past 3 nights and took advantage of sketching some feature of the Moon every night. On 12/1/14 my eye rested upon the partly eroded walls of Capuanus Crater and the surrounding region north of Palus Epidemiarum. At the time of the observation the 60 km wide crater cast a deep shadow to the west and over a rim of rock placing it partially in shadow. Smaller Elger Crater is visible just to the west of the rim of Capuanus just beyond the shadows. A multitude of smaller more complex appearing craters border the southern edge of Capuanus. The small mare of Lacus Timoris (Lake of Fear) can be seen to the south near the terminator.

Cindy (Thia) Krach

Capuanus Crater 10 day lunation
12/1/14
2130-2245 HST
12.5” Portaball, 6.7mm 227x
Maui, Hawaii
Black Fabriano Paper 6”x 6”
white & black Conte’ Crayons


Crater Posidonius at Sunset

Lunar crater Posidonius and environs at sunset - August 7, 2012
Lunar crater Posidonius and environs at sunset – August 7, 2012

Crater Posidonius at Sunset

On this night I watched the sunset terminator creep slowly toward ring-plain crater
Posidonius; in addition I sketched the crater and other features on the floor of Mare Serenitatis. Posidonius (96 km.) is an old upper Imbrian era impact remnant. Its age is underlined by the way shadows penetrate the rim at numerous points betraying impact damage there. The highest part of the rim is on the terminator side of this crater. Sunlight was still reaching Posidonius A and other high points on ridges including one on the inner ring. Beyond this crater to the west and south the great serpentine ridge could be seen in best light. This ridge is made up of dorsa Smirnov and dorsa Lister.

Sketching:

For this sketch I used: black Strathmore 400 Artagain paper 9″x 12″, white and black Conte’ pastel pencils and a blending stump. After scanning, Brightness was decreased just slightly using my scanner.

Telescope: 10 inch f/ 5.7 Dobsonian and 6 mm eyepiece 241x

Date: 08-07-2012, 06:30 – 07:40 UT

Temperature: 29°C (85° F)
clear, calm

Seeing: Antoniadi III

Colongitude 147.9 °

Lunation 19 days

Illumination: 73.4 %



Frank McCabe


Luna Through Cloud

The six day old crescent Moon through the clouds - April 16, 2013
The six day old crescent Moon through the clouds – April 16, 2013

Not really an astronomical observation more a romantic interlude.

Best to all, Dale

Do you want to know more about my interest in astronomy? If so take a look at my Website: http://www.chippingdaleobservatory.com/

Keep up to date with observations from Chippingdale Observatory by reading the Blog http://www.chippingdaleobservatory.com/blog/


Lunar craters Aristoteles and Mitchell

Lunar craters Aristoteles and and Mitchell - November 28, 2014
Lunar craters Aristoteles and and Mitchell – November 28, 2014

Hi,

Tonight I could do yet another lunar crater sketch:

Object Name: Aristoteles and Mitchell
Object Type: Lunar Crater
Location: Germany, Dusseldorf area
Date: 2014-11-28, 1910-1940 CET
Media: chalk pencil and charcoal pencil on black sketching cardbox
Telescope: Celestron Nexstar 127 SLT
Eyepiece: TS HR Planetary 7mm
Clear skies!

Achim


Lunar craters Snellius and Stevinus

Lunar craters Snellius and Stevinius - November 25, 2014
Lunar craters Snellius and Stevinius – November 25, 2014

Hi,

yesterday evening, I got the opportunity to do another chalk/charcoal sketch of the moon. Here we go with my sketch of craters Snellius and Stevinus. Due to the bad seeing, I couldn’t go beyond the 10mm eyepiece this time.
Object Name: Snellius and Stevinus
Object Type: Lunar Crater
Location: Germany, Dusseldorf area
Date: 2014-11-25, 1715-1745 CET
Media: chalk pencil and charcoal pencil on black sketching cardbox
Telescope: Celestron Nexstar 127 SLT
Eyepiece: Celestron X-cel 10mm
Clear skies!

Achim


Lunar Crater Copernicus

Lunar crater Copernicus - November 3, 2014
Lunar crater Copernicus – November 3, 2014

Lunar Crater Copernicus

Across the Carpathian Mountains resting on the eastern Ocean of Storms is the
landmark crater of the Sea of Islands, mighty Copernicus. Copernicus is a 95
kilometer diameter complex crater that begins to show itself in all its majesty
two days past first quarter. During the time of “Snow-Ball Earth” 800 million
years ago the event that created Copernicus suddenly occurred. What remains is a
3.8 kilometer deep hummock covered flat floored, centrally peaked, terrace walled
spectacular sentinel. Especially during high sun the bright ray system of this
crater can be seen extending from the base of the glassy glacis in all directions.
The descent from the rampart to the mare floor below is about one kilometer. Three
of five peaks were clearly visible in morning sunlight. In 1999 the Clementine
near infrared camera detected magnesium iron silicates in the peaks indicating
rebound of this deep rock through the surface crust following the impact event.
To view this impressive crater all you need is a good pair of binoculars and an
opportunity between two days past first quarter and one day past last quarter.
Weather permitting, you can see it tonight.

Sketching:

For this sketch I used: black Strathmore 400 Artagain paper, 9”x 12”, white and
black Conte’pastel pencils and a blending stump.

Telescope: 13.1 inch f/5.9 Dobsonian and 9mm eyepiece 218x
Date: 11-03-2014, 00:45 – 02:10 UT
Temperature: 0°C (32°F)
clear, calm
Seeing: Antoniadi III
Co longitude: 23.2°
Lunation: 8.9 days
Illumination: 69.3 %
Phase: 67.4°

Frank McCabe


Lunar Crater Clavius

Lunar crater Clavius - November 1, 2014
Lunar crater Clavius – November 1, 2014

My sketch of lunar crater Clavius together with smaller craters Porter and Rutherfurd at the top of the drawing. Clavius measures 225km in diameter and is located near the southern pole of the Moon. It is named after Christophorus Clavius, a 16th century German mathematician and astronomer.

Regards,

Alexei Pace
Astronomical Society of Malta


The Aristarchus Plateau

The Aristarchus Plateau, the lunar crater Aristarchus and environs - October 5, 2014
The Aristarchus Plateau, the lunar crater Aristarchus and environs – October 5, 2014

The Aristarchus Plateau, the lunar crater Aristarchus and environs – October 5, 2014[/caption]The Aristarchus plateau is one of the biggest and most spectacular volcanic regions in the Moon. With good seeing and the Moon high above the horizon, the region was impressive on October 5th, when it was near the terminator. Vallis Schröteri, the giantic lava channel meanders through the plateau starting from the famous Cobra Head vent, which is now mostly under shadow. The Aristarchus crater has a very bright wall with two dark bands; and to its north, Rupes Toscanelli stands out nicely. Finally, to the south of the plateau, the Herodotus Omega dome is easy to see, thanks to the oblique illumination.

Sketch: 2HB graphite pencil on white paper, scanned and processed with Photoshop CS3
Object Name: The Aristarchus Plateau
Location: Asturias, Spain
Date: October 5th, 2014 21:30-22:30 UT
Instrument: 120mm f/8.3 refractor + Barlow 2x + UWA 6,7mm (300x)
Observing report (in Spanish): https://sites.google.com/site/astrodgonzalez/observaciones/201410-aristarco
Best regards,
Diego González


Gassendi at Terminator

Lunar crater Gassendi - October 4, 2014
Lunar crater Gassendi – October 4, 2014

Object Name: Gassendi
Object Type: Lunar Crater
Location: Dunboyne Ireland
Date: 4th October 2014
Media: Graphite pencil H2, H3 & B6 with standard white stock and technical drawing equipment.

This is actually sketched as observed through the eyepiece with a 15mm on a 9.25 SCT rather than from the phone screen. The seeing was fair but a weather front was fast approaching and just managed to observe long enough to capture this detail. At the same time I took some snapshots through the eyepiece with my smartphone for a smartphone astronomy site – so got to do both before the clouds rolled in. Adding the phone to the sketch allows me to add a technical drawing into the mix which I not (only) enjoy but also allows me to capture the evenings activities and optical equipment used during the session.

Many Thanks

Kevin


Rupes Recta on the Moon

Rupes Recta, "The Straight Wall", a linear fault - March 15, 2008
Rupes Recta, “The Straight Wall”, a linear fault – March 15, 2008

Object Name: Rupes Recta on the Moon
Object Type: Moon crater
Location: Chiba Japan
Date: 2008/3/15
Media Black graphite pencil on a white paper. Contrast adjusted with PC.

Equipments:: Telescope: Televue 85, Eyepiece: Pentax XW-10 with Power mate 2.5x

After outlining major features using solid lines, dotted lines and numbers(1-9) are used to express gradation in brightness(right). The numbers are replaced with “real” darkness after the lines are copied on another paper (left).

Thanks.

Takeshi