Mooncrater – Wilhelm

Lunar crater Wilhelm - October 3, 2014
Lunar crater Wilhelm – October 3, 2014

Hello,

last week (October, 3rd, 2014) I met my astro-friend Ralf Mündlein in his nice observatory. In his 5m dome with 16″ ACF and 8″ Apo we started our observation. First object in this night was the moon. The air was excellent and we were very happy to have such great impressions on our cosmical neightbour.

A chose the nice crater Wilhelm with some bigger impacts around the craterwall. A fine mountain chain at the bottom of the crater took my attention. So I made a drawing of this crater with the 8″ Apochromat. It was hard work, because there were so many details. I needed nearly one hour to catch the whole crater.

CS Uwe

Object: Moon
Object Name: Crater Wilhelm
Telescope: 200mm Apo
Eyepiece: 6mm Ethos
Magnification: about 300x
Location: Lindelbach near Würzburg, Germany


Craters Ptolemaeus, Alphonsus and Arzachel

Lunar craters Ptolemaeus, Alphonsus and Arzachel -October 1, 2014
Lunar craters Ptolemaeus, Alphonsus and Arzachel -October 1, 2014

Hi,

Here’s my lunar sketch of today.
Object Name: Ptolemaeus, Alphonsus and Arzachel
Object Type Lunar Craters
Location: Home terrace, Dusseldorf region, Germany
Date: Oct 1st, 2014, 1930-2000 CEST
Media: charcoal and white pastel on black cardbox
Clear skies!

Achim


Early Morning Pitatus and Neighbors

Lunar crater Pitatus and environs - September 17, 2014
Lunar crater Pitatus and environs – September 17, 2014
Lunar crater Pitatus and environs (labeled) - September 17, 2014
Lunar crater Pitatus and environs (labeled) – September 17, 2014

Pitatus is an old, large 97 km. diameter crater on the edge of Mare Nubium. The floor of this crater has a linear central peak which was casting a fine elongated triangular shadow at the time of this observation and sketch. To the south craters Wurzelbauer (88 km.) and Gauricus (79 km.) could be seen; both of these craters show badly warn rims; both much older than Pitatus. Attached to the northwest rim of Pitatus is the crater Hesodius (43 km.). At about the eighth or ninth day of lunation you can observe the famous “sunrise ray” beaming across the floor of Hesodius through a break in the wall with Pitatus. This is certainly a sight worth observing.

Sketching:

For this sketch I used: Black Strathmore 400 Artagain paper, 12”x 9”, both white and
black Conte’pastel pencils and blending stumps.

Telescope: 10 inch f/5.7 Dobsonian and 9mm eyepiece 161x
Date: 09-17-2014 10:00-11:25 UT
Temperature: 5°C (42°F)
Clear, calm
Seeing: Antoniadi III
Co longitude: 187.3°
Lunation: 22.6 days
Illumination: 39.0 %

Frank McCabe


Crater Gassendi and the northern part of Mare Humorum

Lunar crater Gassendi and the the northern part of Mare Humorum - September 5, 2014
Lunar crater Gassendi and the the northern part of Mare Humorum – September 5, 2014

Here is a sketch of the Moon on the 5th of September from my backyard
in Adelaide, South Australia.

The moons phase was waxing at 83%, with only the very western edge
still in shadow. I observed with a C11 SCT. Seeing was quite
reasonable, so I took a 15mm eyepiece + 2x Barlow for a close look.

The shallow illumination on Mare Humorum made the creases on the mare
floor stand out. Crater Gassendi, toward the bottom, showed stark
shadows. Rimae Hippalus was visible, passing through the partially
submerged crater Hippalus at the top right. Because I used a diagonal
prism, the sketch is mirror imaged.

I used pastel chalks and black and white pastel pencils on black
paper.

-Ivan


Dorsa Euclides F and Euclides

Dorsa Euclides and the lunar crater Euclides - August 6, 2014
Dorsa Euclides and the lunar crater Euclides – August 6, 2014

Dorsa Euclides F and Euclides

Object Type: Moon

Location: Tarragona – Spain

Usually it is not easy for me to draw the moon, and if I have to draw something as delicate as lunar wrinkle ridges (dorsa / Dorsum), things get complicated. But the time I spent enjoying Dorsa F Euclides, Euclides and the neighbors ghost craters worth it.

For more details of my observation you can visit my blog:

http://laorilladelcosmos.blogspot.com.es/2014/09/dorsa-euclides-f-euclides.html

Date and Time: 2014-08-06, 21h 50m UT

Telescope: SC Celestron 235mm (9.25″); CGEM mount.

Eyepiece: 7.5mm (313x)

White paper, HB2 graphite pencil, and scanned with Photoshop

Seeing: 4/5 (5 the best)

Transparency: Clear. Rural skies.

Thank you and best regards.

Oscar


Crater Clavius Out and Over the Terminator

Lunar crater Clavius - September 3, 2014
Lunar crater Clavius – September 3, 2014

Among the large craters of the lunar southern highlands, a nearly 4 billion year old crater stood out over the terminator on this evening just after local sunset here in the central USA. This crater is the 230 km. diameter impactor known by the name Clavius. Clavius is blanketed with a sizable number of craters and numerous craterlets . The north-northeastern rim of Clavius has a large crater resting upon it and most of its rim is just catching the light of sunrise. This 52 km. diameter crater is Porter. Much of the central floor of crater Clavius remains in darkness except for Clavius D (21 km.) and to its right in the sketch Clavius C (13 km.). Note that crater D is casting a nice shadow across the high central floor which is just beginning to light up in the lunar morning sun.

Sketching:

For this sketch I used: Black Canson sketching paper, 8”x10”, white and black Conte’ pastel pencils and blending stumps.
Telescope: 10 inch f/ 5.7 Dobsonian and 6 mm eyepiece 241x
Date: 09-03-2014 01:05-02:00 UT
Temperature: 26°C (79°F)
Partly cloudy, breezy
Seeing: Antoniadi III
Co longitude: 14.9°
Lunation: 8.47 days
Illumination: 56.7 %

Frank McCabe


Zeno Crater

Zeno crater - August 11, 2014
Zeno crater – August 11, 2014
Zeno crater imagined- oil painting
Zeno crater imagined – oil painting

I hope,have to correct my previous ASOD posted that sketched on 11,11,2011 [ The Chevallier crater ] as to [The Zeno crater] ….. in the begining month of this year I found this name in Wiki and now most probably this split rimed crater,s name is maybe “Zeno” . The LRO photo shows a 5 km diameter criminal impactor crater vividly laid on the demolished and streamed down rim-wall that I think must be made of reratively soft weak meterial or even I think the small impactor crater was not ” the a criminal ” for this dramaticaly split rim of Zeno.

This 60km diameter crater is located near the Moon,s limb upper Mare Crisium and looked always long slender elliptical shape. For the first time I saw it accidentally with my 8″ dob on excelent seeing night on 10.25, 1999. Second time,with my 8″ refractor on 11.11,2011 , and now I have 10-12 night observations for this interesting crater.

The bottom in my sketch , a inserted 8″ dob,s old sketch shows a small convex hill between split rims of maybe over 2-4km height and that was sketched also as a more impactor crater like in my other 8″ og observations at more favorable librations but even yet where I did not certain whether it was the impactor crater or a massif hill ,barely visible.

The 16″ dob sketch shows the Zeno with it,s environs well, When starting 13″ og observing after 16″ dob , the shadow of the strong jet-stream flow over 20km upper atmosphere passed through on the lunar disc from north pole to south pole at a velocity per in every 0.1 second speed in the eyepices view for 15-20 minutes and strangely eyepiece seeing was ok . Still the interior environs between splited rims were not seen sharply but outer black sharp shadows were well seen, so, shadow [A] consistently 1 hour viewed on the other hand shadow [B] was not viewed for 40 minutes and unexpectedly suddenly appeared as a 2km long, 200m wide jet black shadow in the x420 84 * bino- eyepieces view . This [A] and [B] consist the two legs of the rushing out blackbird shape black shadow that I observed in other nights 1.5years ago.

Turn my eyes to the 500-600km long west lunar limb of Mare Orientale environs for a brief rest, I could see some 10-15 single mountains and 5-6 twin mountains which looked almost similarly but with less details than that I posted here 6,21, 2014. , untill soon after dark clouds stopped the night,s observation.

In recent several lunar observing night, I thought about why there exist no atmosphere molecules on the Moon,… It,s because of weak gravity, .. then from where and when the gravity begins or generates ?

Myself final answer yet…. it generated from in the body of the every a quark or a lepton as a form of “graviton particles” . Need more study.

—————-

Object; Zeno crater

Observe/ Sketch for 1.5 hours; AUG,11, 2014,

16″ dob, x130,x260, uwa14 #4000, 2x bal

13″ refractor, x 420, mostly uwa 8.8s #4000, binoviewer

tak abbe 6, 9mms, nagler 7mms

8″ dob (10,25,1999), x240, x480 , nagler4.8, 2x bal

Lunation ; all 16 -16.5 day

Location ; Backyard home in South Korea

A local made white paper [33 x25 cm] with pencils , black ink, and a old 1999 sketch was inserted

My oil painting 61x73cm imagened before I saw LRO photo of Zeno


Bailly Crater and Region

Lunar crater Bailly and environs - August 9, 2014
Lunar crater Bailly and environs – August 9, 2014

Hi,

Please accept my submission of Baily crater and surrounding region. The weather was very nice that night; warm and dry and the seeing was excellent. The Moon’s liberation was favorable to bring Bailly just past the terminator. I made this sketch using my 10” Discovery Dobsonian telescope at a magnification of 170x with neutral filter.

Object Name: Bailly crater and region.
Object Type: Lunar Crater
Location: My backyard in Green Bay, WI, USA
Date: 8/9/2014 2:00 UTC
Media: mechanical graphite pencils (2H, HB, 2B, 4B), white paper and blending stumps

Thank you,

Brian Chopp


Sirsalis Crater Area

Sirsalis crater and environs - August 9, 2014
Sirsalis crater and environs – August 9, 2014

• Object Name: Sirsalis crater area
• Object Type: Lunar crater
• Location:Terrace housing Alcorcón – Spain
• Date: August 8, 2014 22:30h TU – Lunation 13 days, illumination 95%
• Media: Graphite Pencil 3H, 6B, 6B graphite rod torchon 1 and white paper
• Formated with GIMP 2.8

Observation notes:

Drawing Sirsalis crater area
(Position: Longitude: 60.507° West Latitude: 12.492° South Side: Nearside Quadrant: South-West Area: Moon West limb)

Rima Sirsalis (left)
craters:
Sirsalis of 41 km is superimposed on Sirsalis A of 48 km.
To the left and from top to bottom:
Sirsalis H: 26 km.
Sirsalis G: 30 km.
Sirsalis F: 13 Km.
Sirsalis J: 12 Km.

New 10” dob telescope, 220x. City sky. 25º C. Moisture 40 º/º.

Greetings to all visitors of this page. PVG. Alcorcon, Madrid 8/10/2013


Moon-Crater Mersenius

Lunar crater Mersenius - August 7, 2014
Lunar crater Mersenius – August 7, 2014

Hello,

After some weeks during the “White nights” without a look in the sky, I started observation at the 7th August with my new 130/1200 Aspherical Doublet Apochromat (it was planned by Ralf Mündlein and me in the last two years) the planet. The air was quite well and the conditions were warm and dry.

A nice crater with some little impacts and mountains at the bottom took my attention. So I made a drawing of this view. I hope you like the “Mersenius”.with it´s nice landscape.

CS Uwe

Object: Moon
Object Name: Crater Mersenius
Telescope: 130/1200 Aspherical Doublet Apochromat
Eyepiece: 7mm Nagler / Maxbright Binocular
Magnification: about 170x
Location: near Tauberbischofsheim Germany


A little fat Owl

"A Little Fat Owl", Lunar craters Fra Mauro, Parry and Bonpland - May 8, 2014
“A Little Fat Owl”, Lunar craters Fra Mauro, Parry and Bonpland – May 8, 2014

It had been a while since I did a lunar sketch. May saw me complete my first lunar sketch in many months. I made several attempts, but on those occasions, seeing was so poor the Moon was ‘boiling’ using just 100X magnification. Disappointing and frustrating. Eventually things did change in my favour…

As always, unless I have a specific target in mind, I just let my eye wonder along the terminator to see what pricks my interest. And, as there are several repeated alphanumeric apparitions on the Moon, I’ve found a second avian one! Some time ago I spotted an owl formed around the crater Mercator. Last night I found a second Owl, this time around the flooded craters Fra Mauro (the fat body), Parry (the right eye), and Bonpland (the left eye).Cute little fella I think is formed here J.

As it turns out, Fra Mauro is just to the south of the Apollo 14 landing site – south is to the top of the page, so the Apollo 14 site lies just below where the Owl’s feet would be.

Object: “Little Fat Owl”, craters Fra Mauro, Parry and Bonpland
Scope: C8, 8” SCT
Gear: 5mm Baader Hyperion, 400X
Date: 8th May, 2014
Location: Sydney, Australia
Media: White & grey soft pastel, charcoal and white ink on A5 size black paper
Duration: approx. 2hrs.


Copernicus crater

Lunar crater Copernicus - July 8, 2014
Lunar crater Copernicus – July 8, 2014
Detail of Copernicus crater - July 8, 2014
Detail of Copernicus crater – July 8, 2014

The atmosphere on my loction is generally not stable in spring ,summer and I had to eyepiece- sketch fastly this crater for 1 hour before the heavy clouds came on and hid the moon.

Think about the never- changing lunar morphology always make my mind to be infatuated with humble, sad, lonely feelings.

This relatively young [ yes, … “young” ] lunar crater has a 800 million years old age. My humble heart can not accept ,perceive even the vastness of the time-span of my mother country’s 4500 years written history…. then, Ahy-, … it is like as that the repeat of merely 200,000 times mother country’s full history will reach the age of the Copernicus crater.

—————-

Object; Copernicus crater [sketched only 1/6 area]

Observe/ Sketch for 1 hours; July 8, 2014

13″ refractor, x 420, uwa 8.8s #4000, binoviewer

Lunation ; 12 day

Location ; Backyard home in South Korea

White paper [33 x25 cm] with pencils , A4 priter paper for explanation


Another Look Near to the Altai Scarp at Higher Sun

The lunar craters Riccius, Rabbi Levi, Zagut and Lindenau near the Altai Scarp - July 4, 2014
The lunar craters Riccius, Rabbi Levi, Zagut and Lindenau near the Altai Scarp – July 4, 2014
Riccius, Rabbi Levi, Zagut and Lindenau - Labeled
Riccius, Rabbi Levi, Zagut and Lindenau – Labeled

Two hundred or so kilometers to the southwest of the Altai Scarp you will find a mix of large and small highland craters that may catch your eye as they did mine. Many have written of the “boring” look-a-like craters of this region but good lighting can make a big difference in appeal here. Ancient Riccius crater (71 km.) is a worn, an almost obliterated remnant, covered and surrounded by crater from 10-15 km. of various ages. Adjacent to Riccius is crater Rabbi Levi (81 km.) with an interesting short chain of craters across its floor. The next crater Zagut (84 km.) is the largest of those in the sketch with Zagut A (11 km.) near the center of the floor and Zagut E (35 km.) pushed through the eastern wall of Zagut. Next to Zagut is crater Lindenau (53 km.) which is younger than the other large crater here as evidenced by the sharper rim and what looks like a part of a central peak remaining.
A fine summer evening of observing and sketching after a long spell of poor weather.
Sketching and Equipment:

For this sketch, I used black Strathmore 400 Artagain paper 8” x 12”, white and
black Conte’ pastel pencils and blending stumps.
Telescope: 10 inch f/5.7 Dobsonian and 6 mm eyepiece (241x) riding on an equatorial platform
Date: 07-04-2014, 01:15-02:50 UT
Temperature: 16° C (60° F)
Clear, calm
Seeing: Average – Antoniadi III
Transparency: 4.5/5
Colongitude: 349.0 °
Lunation: 6.7 days
Illumination: 36 %

Frank McCabe


Maurolycus at Terminator

Lunar craters Maurolycus and Barocius on the terminator - June 6, 2014
Lunar craters Maurolycus and Barocius on the terminator – June 6, 2014

Object Name : Maurolycus

Object Type: Lunar Crater
Location Torrevieja Spain
Date Friday 6th June
Media (graphite pencil 2H/6B/2B , charcoal (Hard/Dark), white paper,
Sketched whilst on holiday with good conditions and viewed through small Travelscope 70 mm refractor and 9mm eyepiece.

Regards

Kevin


Plato

Lunar crater Plato - June 8, 2014
Lunar crater Plato – June 8, 2014

Object Type (Lunar Crater)
Location (Vins sur Caramy – Var – France)
Date (08-06-2014)
Media (graphite pencil, white paper )
Made through my 254mm reflector with 25mm EP and 2.5 barlow lens.
Misc. graphite pencils on white paper. No scanning, (this is just a camera shot).
This sketch is issued of my first steps in drawing the moon.

Thank you
Patrick


Sinus Iridum

Sinus Iridum - June 8, 2014
Sinus Iridum – June 8, 2014
Hi,

Find attached a sketch of Sinus Iridum with craters Bianchini, Laplace A, Laplace D and Heraclides E done yesterday evening.

Object Name Sinus Iridum, The Moon
Object Type Impact basin
Location Dusseldorf region, Germany
Date June 8th, 2014, 2120-2205 CEST
Media white pastel pen, charcoal pen on black cardbox paper
Telescope: Celestron Nexstar 127/1500 SLT
Eyepiece: TS HR Planetary 7mm
Best Regards,

Achim


Anaximander environs

Anaximander environs - December 14, 2013
Anaximander environs – December 14, 2013

Tonight, DEC, 14th, 2013. I could have a brief time for an observation/sketching on the nothern moon limb ,

the environs of the crater [ Carpenter, Anaximander, J . Herschel ] .

I have focused 8″ refractor at the curiously connected shadow casted by the splitted rim- walls of each of Anaximander,s and of J, Herschel, s .

Although, seeing was bad , I observed/ sketched this for 40-50 minutes.

—————-

8″ f12 a chinise made achromatic lens , x340

location; Backyard home in South. Korea

white paper [40 x30 cm] , graphite pencils , black ink

Date of observe/ sketch ; 12, 14, 2013


Tycho

Lunar crater Tycho - May 9, 2014
Lunar crater Tycho – May 9, 2014

Tycho

Object Type: Moon

Location: Tarragona – Spain

A childhood memory: Summer, 1975, Tycho observed with an old binoculars 8×30 of my father. I never would have imagined be viewed as night May 9, 2014.

For more details of my observation you can visit my blog:

http://www.laorilladelcosmos.blogspot.com.es/2014/05/tycho.html

Date and Time: 2014-05-09, 21h 49m UT

Telescope: SC Celestron 235mm (9.25″); CGEM mount.

Eyepiece: 7.5mm (313x)

White paper, HB2 graphite pencil, and scanned with Photoshop

Seeing: 4/5 (5 the best)

Transparency: Clear. Rural skies.

Thank you and best regards.

Oscar


Gassendi in Mare Humorum

Mare Humorum and Gassendi crater - March 12, 2014
Mare Humorum and Gassendi crater – March 12, 2014

Object name: Mare Humorum, Gassendi Crater
Object Type: Lunar Crater
Location: Lisbon, Portugal ( 38º 44′ N 9º 30′ W)
Date: 12-03-2014
Media: graphite pencil

Equipment: ED doublet refractor, 80/720mm, (3.15″) F9; EP 9mm OR, 80x.
This was my third sketch, the first attempt was such an enjoyable expirience that I repeated it the following nights.
Fortunately I had 3 or 4 good nights in a row.

Clear skies
Bernardo Andrade


Lunar North Polar Region

Lunar North Pole Region-04-09-2014
Lunar North Pole Region-04-09-2014
Lunar North Pole Region-04-09-2014
Lunar North Pole Region-04-09-2014

Lunar North Polar Region

For several nights this week the lunar North Pole has been tilted more towards earth due to favorable lunar libration in latitude. It has been a good opportunity to view craters such as Whipple, Peary, Byrd and others. I had a clear night with average seeing so I took advantage of the opportunity to sketch the illuminated region near the pole. At my location the Moon was at more than 60 degrees above the horizon which also helped with the time needed to complete a sketch.

Sketching and Equipment:

For this sketch, I used black Strathmore 400 Artagain paper 9” x 12”, white and

black Conte’ pastel pencils and blending stumps.

Telescope: 13.1 inch f/6 Dobsonian and 6 mm eyepiece (333x) riding on an equatorial platform

Date: 04-09-2014, 01:00-02:35 UT

Temperature: 3° C (38° F)

Clear, calm

Seeing: Average – Antoniadi III

Transparency 4/5

Colongitude 16.2 °

Lunation 9 days

Illumination 63.9 %

Frank McCabe


Copernicus

Lunar Crater Copernicus - March 10, 2014
Lunar Crater Copernicus – March 10, 2014

This is my first ASOD and my first sketch of a moon crater.

Object Name: Copernicus Crater

Object Type: Lunar Crater

Location: Lisbon, Portugal (38º 44′ N 9º 30′ W)

Date: 10-03-2014

Media: graphite pencil

Equipment: ED doublet refractor, 80/720mm, (3.15″) F9; EP 6mm OR, 120x.

It was an exceptional night without wavering at this magnification, so I took a shot at it.

Clear skies

Bernardo Andrade


Lunar Terminator Near to the Western Limb

LunarTerminator West Limb-February 25, 2013
LunarTerminator West Limb-February 25, 2013
LunarTerminator West Limb-February 25, 2013
LunarTerminator West Limb-February 25, 2013

Lunar Terminator Near to the Western Limb

On Sunday evening I was getting a wonderful view of the lunar terminator near the western limb just a half day before full Moon. The favorable longitudinal libration of -04° 40’ was creating an opportunity to see craters along the terminator that are often poorly placed for viewing.
With storms on the way from the southwest this was a good evening to attempt a sketch. The calm before the arrival of storms often leaves the seeing fair to good as was the case on this night. Craters such as Vasco da Gama (99 km.), Bohr (73 km.), Dalton (63 km.), Balboa (71 km.) and part of Einstein (175 km.) were all seen. Craters Cardanus (51 km.) and Krafft (53 km.) and the crater chain (catena) between them were in bright sunlight. The views all along the terminator were magnificent.
Sketching:

For this sketch I used: black Strathmore 400 Artagain paper (9” x 12”), white and black Conte’
pastel pencils. In addition a small artist’s brush and powdered Conte’ white crayon was used for blending. Contrast was slightly increased (+2) using a scanner to better match the original.
Telescope: 13.1 inch f/ 5.9 Dobsonian and 6 mm eyepiece 327 X
Date: 02-25-2013, 04:00-06:30 UT
Temperature: 0.0° C (32° F)
Partly cloudy, calm
Seeing: Antoniadi III
Colongitude 86.9 °
Lunation 14.87 days
Illumination 99.5 %

Frank McCabe


The Apollo 17 Landing Site

Apollo 17 Landing site- January 11, 2014
Apollo 17 Landing site- January 11, 2014

I was hooked when the Chinese [Change III ] had landed on the moon on 14 th December 2013 .

The landing site was in the Mare Imbrium where the peculier landmarks or configurations of the ground were not stood at all, so it seems to me difficult to search the Landing site.

Instead, I have established a plan as an attempting practice to search the Apollo 17 landing site that was issued in the S& T DEC. 2002 p118 or http://www.boulder.swri.edu/~durda/Apollo/landing_sites.html and for the first time I have flown there this night with my refractors …… the result is this a sketch.

It took only 5 minuites to find out where there was with the aid of the one meter diameter paper MOON map of the Arizona University press , …. in the eyepieces, at first I have easily found out the three craters configuration as a red lined triangle marked in my sketch , but without enough previous study for the morphology of this place it was hard to find ” there” [Red lined box].

For the light gathering power of 8″ lens was weak I used only 133 magnification , further the 12″ lens was not adequate in this bad seeing.

—————-

Object; The Apollo 17 Landing Site

Observe/ Sketch; 11. JAN, 2014

8″ f12 refractor, x 133

Lunation ; 11 day

Air temperature; – 8 degree C [very cold]

Location ; Backyard home in South. Korea

White paper [40 x30 cm] , graphite pencils


Posidoniu​s: a FFC crater

Posidonius crater-March 7, 2014
Posidonius crater-March 7, 2014

Hi

This is a sketch of the crater Posidonius made trought my 6” achromatic refractor (TS Individual 152/900), binoviewer, a pair of 10 mm eyepieces (BCO´s) and Barlow that gave me 330x. The seeing was very poor at the beginning of the session but it was improved until I could get very stable view of this formation.

Posidonius is a beautiful crater that can be classified as a FFC crater (Floor Fractured Crater). It has several fractures on its floor that can be observed with small telescopes, and also the amazing Rima Posidonius, a lava channel that crosses the crater from north to south on the eastern part of the crater. The origin of this kind of FFC´s is controversial but the modern theories suggest that a magmatic intrusion below the crater bulged and fractured the floor.

The complex pattern of the shadows and the variety of characteristics and formations inside Posidonius make this crater a very interesting observation target for any amateur astronomer.

I hope you to enjoy with this sketch.

•Object Name: Posidonius crater
•Object Type: Lunar crater, FFC crater
•Location: Vitoria-Gasteiz (Basque Country)
•Date: 7-3-2014
•Media: graphite pencil on white paper, captured with digital camera and processed with Gimp.

If you wish to read more about this observational report and others, please visit the web of my astronomical group (www.laotramitad.org).

Best regards.

David Sedano


Mooncrate​r Krieger

Lunat crater Krieger-March 13, 2014
Lunar crater Krieger-March 13, 2014

Hello friends of the dark side,

Last week we´ve had some good conditions to observe the moon and his fantastic craters. Near the Schröter-Valley I enjoyed the sight of the crater Krieger.

I hope you like it too:

CS Uwe

Object: “Moon”

Object Name: “Crater Krieger”

Telescope: 10″ ACF

Magnification: 18mm Baader Genuine Orthos in Binocular 180x

Date: 13.March 2014

Location: near Tauberbischofsheim Germany


Aristarchus, Prinz and the Harbinger Mtns.

Aristarchus, Prinz and the Harbinger Mountains-June 20, 2013
Aristarchus, Prinz and the Harbinger Mountains Region-June 20, 2013

The kilometer high rim of Prinz (47 km.) crater was casting a shadow across its own lava flooded floor. The uplifted Harbinger mountains were also casting fine shadows in this region of the lunar surface with its large magma ponds pushing up and freezing in the distant past. The uplifting doming in the region created many fissures for lava escape and flooding to occur. The fissures can be seen clearly on nights of steading seeing. I was denied that detailed view on this night. From the crater Krieger (22 km.) north and somewhat east of Aristarchus (40 km.) four distinct long shadows could be seen crossing to the 70 km. fault called Toscanelli at the edge of the Aristarchus plateau where the terminator was located during the rendering of this sketch.
A fine view in any telescope.

Sketching:
For this sketch I used: black Canson paper, white and black Conte’
pastel pencils and blending stumps, white Pearl eraser
Telescope: 10 inch f/ 5.7 Dobsonian and 9 mm eyepiece 161x
Date: 06-20-2013, 02:40 – 04:10 UT
Temperature: 19° C (68° F)
Partly cloudy, hazy
Seeing: Antoniadi IV (poor)
Frank McCabe


Structural detail of the Pythagoras central peak

Pythagoras central peak-January 15,16 2014
Structural detail of the Pythagoras central peak-January 15,16 2014

On two nights with more better seeing and sunlight angle or libration , I could see these views.

See below 2nd sketch over on the lunar horizon as the border with a line of the imaginary inner rim wall of this 130km diameter crater a bluish 10 mignitude permanent star was being moved on from over the Pythagoras to the Anaxagoras (Pilalous) in 4 minutes, …. that I think means moon and earth twin bodies each was(are) rotating and revolving.

It was thrilling to gaze and feel this massive giant old rocky ball goes ahead swinging or pitching his body in space.

—————-

8″ f12 refractor, x340

Location ; Backyard home in South. Korea

White paper [40 x30 cm] , graphite pencils , black ink


Montes Caucasus

Montes Caucasus - June 15, 2013
Montes Caucasus – June 15, 2013

Object Type: Moon
Location: Barcelona – Spain

I don’t observe the moon as much as I would like. It’s a shame, because when I do it, I always really enjoy it. On the seventh night of lunation, the Montes Caucasus shadows are really exciting. I would like to know how to draw better to capture what I could really see that June night. It was amazing.

For more details of my observation you can visit my blog:
http://laorilladelcosmos.blogspot.com.es/2014/03/montes-caucasus.html

Date and Time: 2013-06-15, 21h 05m UT
Telescope: SC Celestron Nexstar 5i (127mm)
Eyepiece: 6mm (208.33x)
White paper, HB2 graphite pencil, and scanned and inverted with Photoshop
Seeing: 4/5 (5 the best)
Transparency: Clear. A little light pollution.

Thank you and best regards.

Oscar


Lambert & Mons La Hire

Crater Lambert, Mons La Hire and Dorsum Zirkel - February 9, 2014
Crater Lambert, Mons La Hire and Dorsum Zirkel – February 9, 2014

Made this sketch of crater Lambert, Mons La Hire and Dorsum Zirkel and surrounding areas this evening, using my 505mm mirror and Watec video camera on its least sensitive setting. The view on the monitor was delightful and one I shared with optical designer and engineer Mr Es Reid of Cambridge, all very civilized and enjoyable.

The sketch was made on black A5 220gm art paper using Conte hard pastels and acrylic paint for bright highlights and deep shadow.

I hope you like it.

Kind regards, Dale

Do you want to know more about my interest in astronomy? If so take a look at my Website: www.chippingdaleobservatory.com

Keep up to date with observations from Chippingdale Observatory by reading the Blog http://chippingdaleobservatory.com/blog/


Posidonius

Posidonius Crater - January 7, 2014
Posidonius Crater – January 7, 2014

Hello,

Posidonius is the result of the first 20 minutes of my “moon observing night” at 7th. January 2014. A dense cloud cover moved on after that.
Deep black sky, spring-like temperatures, ordinary air peace and beautiful details on the moon … and then it was over.

Well, the “coarse drawing” was finished yet. Unfortunately I brought the many fine details that were clearly visible, not on paper.
Nevertheless, I am satisfied with the drawing. Hope you like it too.

CS Uwe

Object name: “Posidonius” Crater
Object: Lunar Crater
Location: Germany, near Tauberbischofsheim
Telescope: 115/805 TMB Refractor
Eyepiece: 4mm UWAN Williams
Magnification: 200x


Gassendi and Region

Gassendi and Mersenius Craters - September 17, 2013
Gassendi and Mersenius Craters – September 17, 2013

Hi,

Please accept my sketch of Gassendi and Mersenius craters and surrounding region. I created this sketch from my backyard in Green Bay, Wisconsin during a night of rare excellent seeing. Its a very interesting region of the Moon just off the boarder of Mare Humorium. I made the sketch using my 10in Discovery Dobsonian telescope at 170x with a neutral filter. For this sketch I used white paper with 2H, HB and 2B graphite pencils and blending stumps to smooth. I hope you enjoy it.

Object Name – Gassendi and Mersenius craters
Object Type – Lunar Surface
Location – Green Bay, WI
Date – Sep 17th, 2013
Media – graphite pencil, white paper, blending stumps
Equipment – 10” Discovery Dobsonian at 170x. Neutral Filter.


Crater Agrippa

Crater Agrippa - February 6, 2014
Crater Agrippa – February 6, 2014

Hello friends artists,all ok?

after many days of bad weather,yesterday i have clear sky(only some
little clouds).The Moon was at zenith over my roof at first
quarter,behind my home Orion giant,Jupiter near zenith.
Clear starry sky and good air are good after work day….
I mounted my refractor Vixen 90/1300 on terrace and i take my eyepiece
12,4mm erfle,the image was steady and i decide for 12,4 plus barlow for
much magnification…..and,after,i decide to take my 3mm planetary.
At first the image was steady but, after 30′ turbulence and clouds
disturbe the clear and steady Moon ……i stopped my sketch……
Well,good night for me!!
I sent to ASOD and i hope like you.
Ciao a tutti!!
Giorgio

Site: Pergola,Marche Region.
Date: 06 of February 2014
Moon: Crescent(7 days after new)
Telescope:Refractor Vixen 90 / 1300
Magnification: 433x
Eyepiece: 3mm planetary
Seeing:Not good,turbulence at the end.


14.16-day-old Moon

Gibbous Moon - February 14, 2014
Gibbous Moon – February 14, 2014

I’ve been doing a study on lunar phases and this is my latest sketch. This is a photo of it from last night after wrapping up my observing session. No adjustments have been made to the sketch other than cropping the lower blank portion of the paper.

My phase sketches used to take close to two hours to complete at the eyepiece. I’ve been building up my endurance to 3-4 hours for a single sketch to include more detail. Obviously, the terminator is drawn first to “freeze” the time stamp on the phase. Then I work my way across the disk at a more leisurely pace, moving my observing chair and stool gradually as the session progresses.

I used a 102mm f/9.8 refractor on an LXD75 mount, 20mm eyepiece setting on my Hyperion zoom, and a 13% T Moon filter to help with contrast. The media is black Strathmore Artagain paper (60 lb., 160 g/m2), white charcoal pencil, black charcoal pencil, white Conte’ crayon, white Conte’ pastel pencil, black Conte’ color pencil,and a blending stump for the maria. I used a circular 6-inch protractor to outline the lunar disk.

Total eyepiece/sketch time is just over four hours on this one.

Best regards,
Erika Rix
www.pcwobservatory.com
Texas, USA


Cook Crater

Cook Crater - February 3, 2014
Cook Crater – February 3, 2014

Object-Cook crater, Moon
Type-Crater
Location-Bangalore, India
Date-3-Feb-2014
Media-0.7mm click pencil, eraser, Processed with PS5…
Seeing condition-Average from city.
Instrument- Sky130mm f6.9Newtonian and Ioptron SmartEQ portable GEM.. 6mm eyepiece…

Hi guys, I sketched this after few weeks… I used Blade to whiten the crater borders….

Regards,
Santhosh S