Triple and Double Stars

Struve 2816, a triple star system and Struve 2819, a double star in the constellation Cepheus
Struve 2816, a triple star system and Struve 2819, a double star in the constellation Cepheus

Hi Asod! My sketch is about a triple and a double stars, in the same field. The triple is STRUVE 2816 and the double STRUVE 2819 and they are both part of the wide open cluster “Trumpler 37″ in Cepheus. I observed the two multiple systems with my Dobson 10” f/5 with a 14mm eyepiece, 82° for a 180x magnification. The observation is great!

Object Name: STRUVE 2816 and STRUVE 2819
Object Type: Triple star, Double star
Location: Copertino (LE), ITALY
Date: 23:40, 19-10-2014 (Local)
Media: India Ink on white paper, inverted


Beta Monocerotis

The multiple (triple) star system, Beta Monocerotis
The multiple (triple) star system, Beta Monocerotis

Hi Asod! Last night I observed Beta Monocerotis, which is called the most beautiful multiple star of our skies. I also loved it, so I decided to sketch the star with my dobsonian telescope 10” f/5. Seeing was not bad, so with 250x I could note easily all the components; but colours were not simple to note, all of them seem to me white, bluish and greenish…
Wonderful star!


A Delicate Triple

Object name: Theta Virginis (Sigma 1724/H III 50)

Object type: Double/Multiple star

Location: York, UK

Date: 24th April 2011

Media: Graphite pencil sketch on white paper at eyepiece, colour added digitally after scanning and reversing.

I often find springtime rather hectic, tracking down all those dim galaxies whilst the sky conditions permit. This year I have rediscovered relaxing in front of the scope, thanks to a birthday gift of the Cambridge Double Star atlas. Double stars allow you the time to enjoy colour and light and pattern without all the frustration of hunting for barely perceptible objects in uncontrollable sky conditions. Here is one of my favourites from this spring; Theta Virginis. The primary is 4th magnitude, I noted as white, with two “brown-orange” companions of 9th-10th magnitude at pleasingly different distances (7’’ and 70’’) and angles from the primary.

I used a Skywatcher Skyliner 152mm f8 Dobsonian with 10mm eyepiece.